Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

A Comparative Study of EU and US Trade Policies for Developing Countries: The Case of Agri-Food Products

Contents:

Author Info

  • Di Rubbo, P.
  • Canali, Gabriele
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Trade relations between developed and developing countries are one of the hot topics of the ongoing World Trade Organization (WTO) negotiations. The conclusion of the Cotonou Agreement between EU and African, Caribbean and Pacific countries, the introduction of the EU’s Everything But Arms initiative for the least developed countries and the United States’ African Growth and Opportunity Act for 39 African Countries, represents tangible incentives for many developing countries to continue their efforts to open their economies and build free markets. This paper analyzes the trade creating effects of EU and US trade policies as total effect, for agri-food products of developing countries in a gravity model framework. Data refer to a 10 year period: 1996-2005. The findings show larger trade creating effects of EU trade policies, especially for upper-middle income countries. Variation in trade creation, across the years, is not statistically significant, except for the low-income countries.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/43961
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium with number 43961.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:43961

    Contact details of provider:
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.eaae.org
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Gross Trade Creation; Agricultural Trade Policy; Developed and Developing Countries; International Relations/Trade;

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
    2. Grilli,Enzo R., 1993. "The European Community and the Developing Countries," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521385114.
    3. Andrew K. Rose & Eric van Wincoop, 2001. "National Money as a Barrier to International Trade: The Real Case for Currency Union," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 386-390, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Cooke, Edgar F A, 2011. "The impact of trade preferences on exports of developing countries: the case of the AGOA and CBI preferences of the USA," MPRA Paper 31439, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:43961. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.