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How Bad is Antidumping?: Evidence from Panel Data

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  • Peter Egger
  • Douglas Nelson

Abstract

Current research on antidumping suggests a number of channels through which antidumping affects the volume of world trade. This paper uses a structural approach to the gravity model framework to evaluate these hypotheses using data on trade volume over the period 1960-2001. We conclude that the volume and welfare effects have been negative, but quite modest.

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File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/gep/documents/papers/2007/07-17.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Nottingham, GEP in its series Discussion Papers with number 07/17.

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Handle: RePEc:not:notgep:07/17

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Keywords: Antidumping; Gravity equation; Multilateral resistance; Panel data econometrics;

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Cited by:
  1. Lu, Yi & Tao, Zhigang & Zhang, Yan, 2013. "How do exporters respond to antidumping investigations?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 290-300.
  2. Chad P. Bown & Rachel McCulloch, 2012. "Antidumping and Market Competition: Implications for Emerging Economies," Working Papers, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School 50, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
  3. Michael Owen Moore & Maurizio Zanardi, 2008. "Trade Liberalization and Antidumping: Is There a Substitution Effect?," Working Papers, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy 2008-09, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  4. Bown, Chad P. & Prusa, Thomas J., 2010. "U.S. antidumping: much ado about zeroing," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 5352, The World Bank.
  5. Christian Gormsen, 2011. "Antidumping with heterogeneous firms," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers), HAL hal-00663024, HAL.
  6. Lu, Yi & Tao, Zhigang & Zhang, Yan, 2012. "How exporters respond to antidumping investigations?," MPRA Paper 38790, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Simone Juhasz Silva & Douglas Nelson, 2012. "Does Aid Cause Trade? Evidence from an Asymmetric Gravity Model," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(5), pages 545-577, 05.
  8. Daumal, Marie, 2008. "Federalism, separatism and international trade," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 675-687, September.
  9. Tibor Besedeš & Thomas J. Prusa, 2013. "Antidumping and the Death of Trade," NBER Working Papers 19555, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Badi H. Baltagi & Peter Egger & Michael Pfaffermayr, 2014. "Panel Data Gravity Models of International Trade," CESifo Working Paper Series, CESifo Group Munich 4616, CESifo Group Munich.

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