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The regional price of junk foods relative to healthy foods in the UK: indirect estimation of a time series, 1997-2009

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  • Capacci, Sara
  • Mazzocchi, Mario
  • Shankar, Bhavani

Abstract

The paper aims at indirectly estimating a time series of food prices from household expenditure data, focusing on foods considered as ‘junk’ relative to healthy foods. The “big 6” among the HFSS (high in fats, sugar and salt) foods identified by the Food Standard Agency have been selected to compose a target ‘unhealthy’ basket, compared to a ‘healthy’ benchmark aggregate including fruit and vegetables. UK data from the National Food Surveys, the Household Expenditure Surveys and the Living Costs and Food Survey were harmonized and merged to compose a set of household level unit values from 1997 to 2009 for the healthy and unhealthy aggregates. Well-established techniques are then employed to estimate regional prices by disentangling the quality component from unit values. The analysis provides information on the geographical and time heterogeneity of estimated price of the unhealthy basket relative to fruit and vegetable prices.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/134720
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural Economics Society in its series 86th Annual Conference, April 16-18, 2012, Warwick University, Coventry, UK with number 134720.

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Date of creation: Apr 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc12:134720

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Related research

Keywords: Price; Unit value; Junk food; Fruit and vegetable; Demand; Elasticity; Healthy diet; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; D11; Q11;

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  1. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  2. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1994, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  4. Ian Crawford & François Laisney & Ian Preston, 2002. "Estimation of household demand systems with theoretically compatible Engel curves and unit value specifications," IFS Working Papers W02/17, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  5. Mazzocchi, Mario & Traill, W. Bruce & Shogren, Jason F., 2009. "Fat Economics: Nutrition, Health, and Economic Policy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199213863, September.
  6. Deaton, Angus, 1987. "Estimation of own- and cross-price elasticities from household survey data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1-2), pages 7-30.
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Cited by:
  1. Pieroni, L. & Salmasi, L., 2014. "Fast-food consumption and body weight. Evidence from the UK," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 94-105.

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