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Why Is Agricultural Labour Productivity Higher In Some Countries Than Others?

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  • Gutierrez, Luciano

Abstract

Agriculture productivity varies dramatically in different regions of the world. Using recent theories of economic growth and new data sets (Larson and al., 1999) as a guide, this study finds some empirical regularities between agricultural labour productivity growth, investment and education, as also for environmental factors, for 44 countries during the period 1980-1993. We find strong evidence that where agricultural investment and educated people rates are higher, agricultural labour productivity grows faster. Secondly, geographical factors as well as freer trade influence growth. Finally, we find evidence of conditional convergence, which means that cross-country agricultural productivity does not converge to the same level of steady state but that productivity in each country converges to its own long-run equilibrium.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL with number 21741.

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Date of creation: 2000
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea00:21741

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Keywords: growth; labour productivity; convergence; Labor and Human Capital; Productivity Analysis;

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  1. Lockheed, Marlaine E & Jamison, Dean T & Lau, Lawrence J, 1987. "Farmer Education and Farm Efficiency: Reply," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 643-44, April.
  2. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
  3. L. Gutierrez & M. M. Gutierrez, 2003. "International R&D spillovers and productivity growth in the agricultural sector. A panel cointegration approach," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 30(3), pages 281-303, September.
  4. Jeffrey Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Progress of Global Integration," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1733, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  5. Sebastian Edwards, 1991. "Trade Orientation, Distortions and Growth in Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 3716, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Macours, Karen & Swinnen, Johan F M, 2002. "Patterns of Agrarian Transition," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(2), pages 365-94, January.
  7. Barro, R.J., 1989. "Economic Growth In A Cross Section Of Countries," RCER Working Papers 201, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  8. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  9. Ethier, Wilfred J, 1982. "National and International Returns to Scale in the Modern Theory of International Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 389-405, June.
  10. Martin, Will & Mitra, Devashish, 2001. "Productivity Growth and Convergence in Agriculture versus Manufacturing," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(2), pages 403-22, January.
  11. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong Wha, 1996. "International Measures of Schooling Years and Schooling Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 218-23, May.
  12. Larson, David F. & Butzer, Rita & Mundlak, Yair & Crego, Al, 2000. "A Cross-Country Database for Sector Investment and Capital," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 371-91, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Francis Teal & Markus Eberhardt, 2009. "A Common Factor Approach to Spatial Heterogeneity in Agricultural Productivity Analysis," Economics Series Working Papers CSAE WPS/2009-05, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Sassi, Maria, 2007. "Structural Change And Economic Convergence Across The Eu-15 Regions: Can The Agricultural Sector Play a Role?," 81st Annual Conference, April 2-4, 2007, Reading University 7961, Agricultural Economics Society.

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