Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this book or follow this series

India : Land Policies for Growth and Poverty Reduction

Contents:

Author Info

  • World Bank
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    In India, land continues to be of enormous economic, social, and symbolic relevance. The way in which land can be accessed and its ownership documented is at the core of the livelihood of the large majority of the poor, especially in rural and tribal areas and determines the extent to which increasingly scarce natural resources are managed. Land policies and administration are critical determinants of the transaction cost associated with modalities to access land for productive, residential, and business use and, through the ease of using land as collateral for credit, the development of the financial sector. Land is also a major source of government revenue and a key element for implementing government programs. This implies that land policies and institutions will have a far-reaching impact on the ability to sustain India's current high rate of growth, the extent to which such growth reaches the poor, and the level and spatial distribution of economic activity. At the same time, the policies put in place by different states and the institutions tasked to implement them often fail to live up to the importance of the issue. In fact, land administration institutions seem to impose high costs without generating commensurate benefits and are generally perceived as corrupt, mismanaged, and lacking transparency. With land reform policies having largely run their course, and growing evidence that restricting land rental may do little to help the poor, many observers have lost confidence in the ability of land institutions to contribute to the welfare of the poor or the potential for improving the performance of land administration. In this chapter the author first show that land administration in India does indeed have shortcomings but also use data from India to show that addressing the shortcomings of the land administration system is necessary. The report then highlights some of the recent success stories to argue that doing so is entirely feasible but only if, in addition to focusing on technical aspects, a number of policy issues are addressed as well.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/15791/796240PUB0Indi00Box379790B00PUBLIC0.pdf?sequence=1
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    as in new window
    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 15791 and published in 2007.

    ISBN: 978-0-19-568959-4
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15791

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Email:
    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Rural Development - Rural Land Policies for Poverty Reduction Public Sector Management and Reform Governance - Regional Governance Communities and Human Settlements - Land Use and Policies Urban Development - Urban Governance and Management Public Sector Development;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Chau, Nancy H, 1998. "Land Reforms in the Presence of Monitoring Costs and International Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(4), pages 564-79, November.
    2. Deininger, Klaus W. & Ayalew, Daniel & Yamano, Takashi, 2006. "Legal Knowledge and Economic Development: The Case of Land Rights in Uganda," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25431, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Basu, Kaushik & Emerson, Patrick M., 2000. "The Economics of Tenancy Rent Control," Working Papers 00-04, Cornell University, Center for Analytic Economics.
    4. Klaus Deininger, 2003. "Land Policies for Growth and Poverty Reduction," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15125.
    5. Raul V. Fabella, 2003. "The comprehensive agrarian reform program and Coase theorem," Philippine Review of Economics, University of the Philippines School of Economics and Philippine Economic Society, vol. 40(1), pages 109-200, June.
    6. Jonathan H. Conning & James A. Robinson, 2001. "Land Reform and the Political Organization of Agriculture," Department of Economics Working Papers 2001-10, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    7. Galor, Oded & Zeira, Joseph, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52, January.
    8. David Andolfatto, 2002. "A Theory of Inalienable Property Rights," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 382-393, April.
    9. Raul V. Fabella, 2003. "Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program and the Coase Theorem," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200302, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    10. Mo, Pak Hung, 2000. "Income Inequality and Economic Growth," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 293-315.
    11. MICHAEL R. CARTER & Frederic Zimmerman, 1998. "The Dynamic Cost and Persistence of Asset Inequality in an Agrarian Economy," Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Staff Papers 416, Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Department.
    12. Deininger, Klaus W. & Jin, Songqing, 2005. "Land Sales and Rental Markets in Transition: Evidence from Rural Vietnam," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19359, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    13. Benjamin, Dwayne, 1995. "Can unobserved land quality explain the inverse productivity relationship?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 51-84, February.
    14. Eswaran, Mukesh & Kotwal, Ashok, 1985. "A Theory of Contractual Structure in Agriculture," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 352-67, June.
    15. Mearns, Robin, 1999. "Access to land in rural India - policy issues and options," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2123, The World Bank.
    16. Bourguignon, F. & Verdier, T., 1997. "Oligarchy, Democracy, Inequality and Growth," DELTA Working Papers 97-10, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
    17. Cardenas, Juan-Camilo, 2003. "Real wealth and experimental cooperation: experiments in the field lab," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 263-289, April.
    18. Nugent, Jeffrey B & Robinson, James A, 2002. "Are Endowments Fate?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3206, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    19. Richard Arnott, 1995. "Time for Revisionism on Rent Control?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 99-120, Winter.
    20. Carter, Michael R, 1984. "Identification of the Inverse Relationship between Farm Size and Productivity: An Empirical Analysis of Peasant Agricultural Production," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(1), pages 131-45, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Deininger, Klaus & Jin, Songqing & Nagarajan, Hari K., 2008. "Efficiency and equity impacts of rural land rental restrictions: Evidence from India," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(5), pages 892-918, July.
    2. Saha, Bibhas & Sen, Kunal & Maiti, Dibyendu, 2013. "Trade openness, labour institutions and flexibilisation: Theory and evidence from India," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 180-195.
    3. Deininger, Klaus & Ali, Daniel Ayalew & Holden, Stein & Zevenbergen, Jaap, 2007. "Rural land certification in Ethiopia : process, initial impact, and implications for other African countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4218, The World Bank.
    4. Calì, Massimiliano & Sen, Kunal, 2011. "Do Effective State Business Relations Matter for Economic Growth? Evidence from Indian States," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1542-1557, September.
    5. Victoria Stanley & Edward Cook & Mika Tarhanen & Gavin Adlington & Keith Bell, 2008. "Information and Communications Technology in Land Administration Projects," World Bank Other Operational Studies 9537, The World Bank.
    6. Klaus Deininger, 2008. "A Strategy for Improving Land Administration in India," World Bank Other Operational Studies 9534, The World Bank.
    7. Deininger, Klaus & Goyal, Aparajita, 2010. "Going digital : credit effects of land registry computerization in India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5244, The World Bank.
    8. Kathuria, Vinish & Seethamma Natarajan, Rajesh Raj & Sen, Kunal, 2010. "State business relations and manufacturing productivity growth in India," MPRA Paper 20314, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:15791. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Breineder).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.