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Going Digital: Computerized Land Registration and Credit Access in India

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  • Deininger, Klaus W.
  • Goyal, Aparajita

Abstract

Despite strong beliefs that property titling and registration will enhance credit access, empirical evidence in support of such effects remains scant. The gradual roll-out of computerization of land registry systems across Andhra Pradesh’s 387 sub-registry offices (SROs) allows us to combine quarterly administrative data on credit disbursed by all commercial banks for a 11 year period (1997-2007) aggregated to the SRO level with the date of shifting registration from manual to digital. Computerization had no credit effect in rural areas but led to increased credit-supply in urban ones. A marked increase of registered urban mortgages due to computerization supports the robustness of the result. At the same time, estimated impacts from reduction of stamp duty are much larger, suggesting that, without further changes in the property rights system, impacts of computerization will remain marginal.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its series 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado with number 61257.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea10:61257

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Related research

Keywords: Land Registration; Credit; Transactions; Computerization; India; International Development; Land Economics/Use; G28; Q24; R51; R52;

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Cited by:
  1. Ayalew Ali, Daniel & Goldstein, Markus, 2011. "Environmental and Gender Impacts of Land Tenure Regularization in Africa," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Ali, Daniel Ayalew & Deininger, Klaus & Goldstein, Markus, 2011. "Environmental and gender impacts of land tenure regularization in Africa : pilot evidence from Rwanda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5765, The World Bank.

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