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The Conservative Nanny State

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  • Dean Baker

Abstract

In his new book, economist Dean Baker debunks the myth that conservatives favor the market over government intervention. In fact, conservatives rely on a range of "nanny state" policies that ensure the rich get richer while leaving most Americans worse off. It's time for the rules to change. Sound economic policy should harness the market in ways that produce desirable social outcomes -- decent wages, good jobs and affordable health care.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) in its series CEPR Books with number 2006-01 and published in 2006.

Order: http://www.conservativenannystate.org/buy.html
Handle: RePEc:epo:booksx:2006-01

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  1. Marc Schaberg & Dean Baker & Robert Pollin, 2002. "Securities Transaction Taxes for U.S. Financial Markets," Working Papers wp20, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  2. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1993. "Small Business and Job Creation: Dissecting the Myth and Reassessing theFacts," NBER Working Papers 4492, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. James M. Poterba & Mark J. Warshawsky, 1999. "The Costs of Annuitizing Retirement Payouts from Individual Accounts," NBER Working Papers 6918, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Baker, Dean & Glyn, Andrew & Howell, David & Schmitt, John, 2004. "Unemployment and labour market institutions : the failure of the empirical case for deregulation," ILO Working Papers 374124, International Labour Organization.
  5. Summers, L.H. & Summers, V.P., 1989. "When Financial Markets Work Too Well : A Cautious Case For A Securities Transactions Tax," Papers t12, Columbia - Center for Futures Markets.
  6. Dean Baker, 2005. "Opening Doors and Smashing Windows: Alternative Measures for Funding Software Development," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-32, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
  7. DiMasi, Joseph A. & Hansen, Ronald W. & Grabowski, Henry G., 2003. "The price of innovation: new estimates of drug development costs," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 151-185, March.
  8. Ian Dew-Becker & Robert J. Gordon, 2005. "Where Did the Productivity Growth Go? Inflation Dynamics and the Distribution of Income," NBER Working Papers 11842, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Ian Dew-Becker & Robert J. Gordon, 2005. "Where Did Productivity Growth Go? Inflation Dynamics and the Distribution of Income," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 36(2), pages 67-150.
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