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The implications of differences between employer and worker employment|earnings reports for policy evaluation

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  • Geoffrey L. Wallace

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

  • Robert Haveman

    (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Abstract

Differences in administrative (UI) and survey (S) records on employment and earnings have substantial implications for assessing the impact of a variety of public interventions, such as welfare-to-work and employment training programs, and especially the state-oriented welfare reform legislation of 1996. We use data from the 1998 and 1999 waves of the Child Support Demonstration Evaluation (CSDE) Resident Parent Surveys to explore individual differences between survey and UI employment and earnings reports for a Wisconsin sample of current and former welfare recipients. After exploring the potential causes of misreports from both sources, we document the degree of discrepancy between survey and UI earnings and employment measures and assess the difference between the two earnings measures in estimates of simple human capital (earnings) functions. Last, we evaluate the correspondence of the two measures with “hardship” indicators of economic well-being.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.20291
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of Policy Analysis and Management.

Volume (Year): 26 (2007)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 737-754

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:26:y:2007:i:4:p:737-754

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/34787/home

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  1. Sheldon Danziger & Colleen M. Heflin & Mary Corcoran & Elizabeth Oltmans, 2002. "Does it Pay to Move from Welfare to Work?," JCPR Working Papers, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research 254, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  2. Kornfeld, Robert & Bloom, Howard S, 1999. "Measuring Program Impacts on Earnings and Employment: Do Unemployment Insurance Wage Reports from Employers Agree with Surveys of Individuals?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 168-97, January.
  3. V. J. Hotz & J. K. Scholz, . "Measuring Employment and Income for Low-Income Populations with Administrative and Survey Data," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty 1224-01, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  4. Howard S. Bloom & Carolyn J. Hill & James A. Riccio, 2003. "Linking program implementation and effectiveness: Lessons from a pooled sample of welfare-to-work experiments," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 551-575.
  5. Sheldon Danziger & Colleen M. Heflin & Mary E. Corcoran & Elizabeth Oltmans & Hui-Chen Wang, 2002. "Does it pay to move from welfare to work?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(4), pages 671-692.
  6. Paul M. Ong, 2002. "Car ownership and welfare-to-work," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(2), pages 239-252.
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Cited by:
  1. Maria Cancian & Daniel Meyer & Steven Cook, 2011. "The Evolution of Family Complexity from the Perspective of Nonmarital Children," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 957-982, August.
  2. Ha, Yoonsook & Meyer, Daniel R., 2010. "Child care subsidy patterns: Are exits related to economic setbacks or economic successes?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 346-355, March.
  3. Kwon, Hyeok Chang & Meyer, Daniel R., 2011. "How do economic downturns affect welfare leavers? A comparison of two cohorts," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 588-597, May.
  4. Wu, Chi-Fang & Cancian, Maria & Wallace, Geoffrey, 2014. "The effect of welfare sanctions on TANF exits and employment," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 1-14.
  5. Fredrik Andersson & Harry J. Holzer & Julia I. Lane & David Rosenblum & Jeffrey Smith, 2013. "Does Federally-Funded Job Training Work? Nonexperimental Estimates of WIA Training Impacts Using Longitudinal Data on Workers and Firms," NBER Working Papers 19446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Wu, Chi-Fang, 2011. "Long-term employment and earnings among low-income families with children," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 91-101, January.

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