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Measuring Program Impacts on Earnings and Employment: Do Unemployment Insurance Wage Reports from Employers Agree with Surveys of Individuals?

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  • Kornfeld, Robert
  • Bloom, Howard S
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    Abstract

    This article attempts to determine whether wage records reported by employers to state unemployment insurance (UI) agencies provide a valid alternative to more costly retrospective sample surveys of individuals as the basis for measuring the impacts of employment and training programs for low-income persons. The authors analyze UL data and survey data for a sample of low-income adults and youths from twelve sites in the National Job Training Partnership Act study. Their comparison indicates that impact estimates based on UI data and survey data were usually comparable. However, average survey-reported earnings were higher than average UI-reported earnings. Copyright 1999 by University of Chicago Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

    Volume (Year): 17 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 168-97

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:17:y:1999:i:1:p:168-97

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Alan B. Krueger, 2002. "Inequality, Too Much of a Good Thing," Working Papers 115, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
    2. Fredrik Andersson & Harry J. Holzer & Julia I. Lane & David Rosenblum & Jeffrey Smith, 2013. "Does Federally-Funded Job Training Work? Nonexperimental Estimates of WIA Training Impacts Using Longitudinal Data on Workers and Firms," NBER Working Papers 19446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jillian Berk & Peter Z. Schochet, 2012. "Impact Estimates Regarding Nonparticipants in the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Program Under the 2002 Amendments," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 7735, Mathematica Policy Research.
    4. Jeffrey R. Kling, 2006. "Incarceration Length, Employment, and Earnings," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 863-876, June.
    5. Douglas B. Holl & Lisa Kolovich & Jeanne Bellotti & Nora Paxton, 2009. "Evaluation of the Prisoner Re-Entry Initiative," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 6151, Mathematica Policy Research.
    6. Geoffrey L. Wallace & Robert Haveman, 2007. "The implications of differences between employer and worker employment|earnings reports for policy evaluation," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 737-754.
    7. Katharine G. Abraham & John Haltiwanger & Kristin Sandusky & James R. Spletzer, 2013. "Exploring Differences in Employment between Household and Establishment Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(S1), pages S129 - S172.
    8. repec:fth:prinin:441 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Dan A. Black & Jeffrey A. Smith & Mark C. Berger & Brett J. Noel, 2002. "Is the Threat of Reemployment Services More Effective than the Services Themselves? Experimental Evidence from the UI System," NBER Working Papers 8825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Jeffrey Grogger & Charles Michalopoulos, 2003. "Welfare Dynamics under Time Limits," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(3), pages 530-554, June.
    11. repec:nsr:niesrd:409 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:fth:prinin:450 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Devah Pager, 2003. "The mark of a criminal record," Natural Field Experiments 00319, The Field Experiments Website.
    14. Kenneth A. Couch & Dana W. Placzek, 2010. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 572-89, March.

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