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Impact Of Farmer Field Schools On Agricultural Income And Skills: Evidence From An Aid‐Funded Project In Rural Ethiopia

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  • Yasuyuki Todo
  • Ryo Takahashi

Abstract

This study estimates the effect of farmer field schools in rural Ethiopia on income from agriculture. The farmer field schools were established in association with participatory forest management associations for forest protection funded by Japanese aid. We employ a difference-in-differences propensity score matching approach to correct for possible biases due to selection of participants. We find that by participating in the farmer field schools, agricultural households increased their real income per worker by about 60-160 US dollars on average, which is equivalent to, or even more than, the average income per worker before the project. We also find evidence that the large increase in income is due to the use of new agricultural practices, such as new varieties, taught and promoted in the farmer field schools.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 25 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (04)
Pages: 362-381

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:25:y:2013:i:3:p:362-381

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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