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Home-Based Work and Women's Labor Force Decisions

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Author Info

  • Linda N. Edwards

    (The Graduate Center, City University of New York)

  • Elizabeth Field-Hendrey

    (Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York)

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    Abstract

    Home-based work differs from other employment because the work site is the home itself. This difference means that the fixed costs of working at home are less than the fixed costs of working on site and that home-based workers may engage in joint market and household production. Using data from the 1990 Census, we find that home-based work is an attractive option for women for whom the fixed costs of work are highwomen who have small children, are disabled, or live in rural areasand that home-based workers are more likely to choose self-employment than are on-site workers.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 170-200

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:20:y:2002:i:1:p:170-169

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Florian Noseleit, 2014. "The impact of childcare enrollment on women’s selection into self-employment," Working Papers 2014/15, Maastricht School of Management.
    2. Mendola, Mariapia & Carletto, Calogero, 2012. "Migration and gender differences in the home labour market: Evidence from Albania," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 870-880.
    3. Caliendo, Marco & Künn, Steffen, 2012. "Getting Back into the Labor Market: The Effects of Start-Up Subsidies for Unemployed Females," IZA Discussion Papers 6830, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Fernanda Llussa, 2011. "Determinants of Entrepreneurship: Are Women Different?," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp555, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    5. Philipp Koellinger & Maria Minniti & Christian Schade, 2008. "Seeing the World with Different Eyes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-035/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 11 Mar 2011.
    6. Scott Adams & John Heywood & Laurie Miller, 2014. "Caregivers, firm policies and gender discrimination claims," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 359-377, June.
    7. Simoes, Nadia & Moreira, Sandrina B. & Crespo, Nuno, 2013. "Individual Determinants of Self-Employment Entry – What Do We Really Know?," MPRA Paper 48403, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Velamuri, Malathi, 2009. "Taxes, Health Insurance and Women's Self-Employment," MPRA Paper 50474, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Apr 2012.
    9. Roche, Kristen, 2013. "Reconciling gender differences in the returns to education in self-employment: Does occupation matter?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 112-119.
    10. Bojnec, Stefan & Dries, Liesbeth & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2003. "Human Capital And Labor Flows Out Of The Agricultural Sector: Evidence From Slovenia," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa 25803, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Pinka Chatterji & Sara Markowitz, 2008. "Family Leave after Childbirth and the Health of New Mothers," NBER Working Papers 14156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Wellington, Alison J., 2006. "Self-employment: the new solution for balancing family and career?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 357-386, June.
    13. Peter Zwan & Ingrid Verheul & A. Thurik, 2012. "The entrepreneurial ladder, gender, and regional development," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 627-643, October.

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