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The Defence Spending-External Debt Nexus In Ethiopia

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  • Yemane Wolde-Rufael
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    Abstract

    The aim of this paper is to examine the impact of defence spending and income on the evolution of Ethiopia's external debt over the period 1970-2005. Using the bounds test approach to cointegration and Granger causality tests, we find a long run and a causal relationship between external debt, defence spending and income. Defence spending had a positive and a significant impact on the stock of external debt while income had a negative and a statistically significant impact on external debt. Our findings suggest that an increase in defence spending contributes to the accumulation of Ethiopia's external debt, while an increase in economic growth helps Ethiopia to reduce its external debt.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Defence and Peace Economics.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 423-436

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:20:y:2009:i:5:p:423-436

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    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/GDPE20

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    Related research

    Keywords: Ethiopia; Defence spending; External debt; Granger causality; Variance decomposition;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Muhammad, Shahbaz & V G R, Chandran & Pervaiz, Azeem, 2011. "Natural gas consumption and economic growth: cointegration, causality and forecast error variance decomposition tests for Pakistan," MPRA Paper 35103, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Nov 2011.
    2. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mohamed Arouri & Frédéric Teulon, 2014. "Short- and Long-Run Relationships between Natural Gas Consumption and Economic Growth: Evidence from Pakistan," Working Papers 2014-289, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    3. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Shabbir, Muhammad Shahbaz & Malik, Muhammad Nasir & Wolters, Mark Edward, 2013. "An analysis of a causal relationship between economic growth and terrorism in Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 21-29.
    4. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Shabbir, Shahbaz Muhammad, 2011. "Is hike in inflation responsible for rise in terrorism in Pakistan?," MPRA Paper 31236, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 29 May 2011.
    5. Muhammad Shahbaz & Faridul Islam & Naveed Aamir, 2012. "Is devaluation contractionary? Empirical evidence for Pakistan," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 45(4), pages 299-316, November.
    6. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Shabbir, Shahbaz Muhammad & Butt, Muhammad Sabihuddin, 2011. "Does Military Spending Explode External Debt in Pakistan?," MPRA Paper 30429, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 21 Apr 2011.
    7. Shahbaz, Muhammad, 2013. "Linkages between inflation, economic growth and terrorism in Pakistan," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 496-506.
    8. Muhammad, Shahbaz & Muhammad, Nasir Malik & Muhammad, Shahbaz Shabbir, 2011. "Does economic growth cause terrorism in Pakistan?," MPRA Paper 35101, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Nov 2011.
    9. Muhammad, Nasir & Muhammad, Shahbaz, 2011. "War on Terror: Do Military Measures Matter? Empirical Analysis of Post 9/11 Period in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 35635, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 29 Dec 2011.

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