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How Do Educational Attainment and Occupational and Wage-Earner Statuses Affect Life Satisfaction? A Gender Perspective Study

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  • Mª del Salinas-Jiménez

    ()

  • Joaquín Artés
  • Javier Salinas-Jiménez
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    Abstract

    The main objective of this paper is to analyze the impact of education on life satisfaction once indirect effects through income, health, participation in the workforce or professional status are controlled for. The focus is placed on gender differences, thus studying whether the effects of education on life satisfaction differ for women and men and whether occupational variables and the individual’s role in the household may mediate this relationship. Among the results, we find that gender differences in life satisfaction tend to disappear when account is taken of the individuals’ role as primary wage earner in the household. Regarding education, our results suggest that its impact on satisfaction with life differs for women and men: both direct and indirect effects of education are found for women whereas no direct effects of education appear in the case of men, but only indirect effects through enhanced job opportunities and professional status. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10902-012-9334-6
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Happiness Studies.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 367-388

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:14:y:2013:i:2:p:367-388

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/content/1389-4978

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    Related research

    Keywords: Life satisfaction; Gender; Education; Occupational status;

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