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Creative destruction and labor's options

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  • Jon Wisman

Abstract

New technology, the fall of Eastern European socialism, new international trade agreements, and a resurgence of classical liberalism have greatly augmented the pace of capitalism's creative destruction. The principal benefits of this process have come in the form of new, better, and less-expensive consumer goods. But this process also generates a generalized sense of insecurity that most afflicts labor. Yet, the dominant ideology that has accompanied this latest burst of creative destruction has not been terribly sympathetic to labor's plight. After analyzing the character of this most recent burst of creative destruction, this paper explores the various options available to labor within a generally hostile ideological climate. The principle focus is on how labor's most promising options may not be found primarily in restablishing constrants upon markets, but rather in gaining greater control over production in the form of greater participation in both firm decision-making and ownership.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Forum for Social Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 51-76

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Handle: RePEc:spr:fosoec:v:30:y:2001:i:2:p:51-76

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/12143

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  1. David, Paul A, 1990. "The Dynamo and the Computer: An Historical Perspective on the Modern Productivity Paradox," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 355-61, May.
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  5. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
  6. Elliott, John E, 1980. "Marx and Schumpeter on Capitalism's Creative Destruction: A Comparative Restatement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 45-68, August.
  7. Ann P. Bartel & Frank R. Lichtenberg, 1985. "The Comparative Advantage of Educated Workers in Implementing New Technology: Some Empirical Evidence," NBER Working Papers 1718, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Dye, Ronald A, 1984. "The Trouble with Tournaments," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(1), pages 147-49, January.
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