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Educational selectivity in U.S. Immigration: How do immigrants compare to those left behind?

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  • Cynthia Feliciano

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.2005.0001
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

    Volume (Year): 42 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 131-152

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:42:y:2005:i:1:p:131-152

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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    1. Green, David A, 1999. "Immigrant Occupational Attainment: Assimilation and Mobility over Time," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 49-79, January.
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    Cited by:
    1. Mark Hayward & Robert Hummer & Chi-Tsun Chiu & César González-González & Rebeca Wong, 2014. "Does the Hispanic Paradox in U.S. Adult Mortality Extend to Disability?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 81-96, February.
    2. Carolina V. Zuccotti & Harry Ganzeboom & Ayse Guveli, 2014. "Was migrating beneficial? Comparing social mobility of Turks in Western Europe to Turks in Turkey and Western European natives," DoQSS Working Papers 14-06, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London.
    3. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2006. "The push-pull effects of the information technology boom and bust: insight from matched employer-employee data," Working Paper 2006-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    4. John Mollenkopf, 2005. "Trajectories for the immigrant second generation in New York City," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Dec, pages 105-120.
    5. Kevin Thomas, 2012. "Migration Processes, Familial Characteristics, and Schooling Dropout Among Black Youths," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 477-498, May.
    6. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & John C. Robertson, 2008. "The Push-Pull Effects of the Information Technology Boom and Bust," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 22(3), pages 200-212, August.
    7. Andrew Halpern-Manners, 2011. "The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work Among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 73-99, February.
    8. Jenna Nobles, 2013. "Migration and Father Absence: Shifting Family Structure in Mexico," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1303-1314, August.
    9. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan & Katherine Eriksson, 2010. "Europe's Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses: Self-Selection and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration," Discussion Papers 09-029, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    10. Stolz, Yvonne & Baten, Joerg, 2012. "Brain drain in the age of mass migration: Does relative inequality explain migrant selectivity?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 205-220.
    11. Dean R. Lillard & Anna Manzoni, 2012. "International Migration as Occupational Mobility," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 498, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    12. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Platt Boustan & Katherine Eriksson, 2012. "Have the Poor Always Been Less Likely to Migrate? Evidence From Inheritance Practices During the Age of Mass Migration," NBER Working Papers 18298, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Renata Ivanova & Byeongju Jeong, 2011. "Why Don't Migrants with Secondary Education Return?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp449, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
    14. Kate Choi & Robert Mare, 2012. "International Migration and Educational Assortative Mating in Mexico and the United States," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 449-476, May.
    15. Michael S. Rendall & Susan W. Parker, 2013. "Two Decades of Negative Educational Selectivity of Mexican Migrants to the United States," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1328, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    16. Aguilar Esteva, Arturo Alberto, 2013. "Stayers and Returners: Educational Self-Selection among U.S. Immigrants and Returning Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 7222, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Hamilton, Tod G. & Hummer, Robert A., 2011. "Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(10), pages 1551-1560.
    18. Natasha T. Duncan & Brigitte S. Waldorf, 2008. "Immigrant Assimilation:Do Neighborhoods Matter?," Working Papers 08-13, Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics.

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