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The Dynamic Effects of U.S. Food Aid

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  • Barrett, Christopher B
  • Mohapatra, Sandeep
  • Snyder, Donald L

Abstract

Although food aid may have important medium- to long-term effects, there is a glaring absence of empirical research on food aid dynamics. This paper applies vector autoregression methods to data from 18 countries over the period 1961-95. We find evidence that food aid has a pronounced J-curve effect on recipient country per capita commercial food imports but only negligible negative effects on recipient country per capita food production. The commercial export gains are primarily enjoyed, however, by the donors' competitors, revealing heretofore unrecognized positive pecuniary trade externalities associated with foreign assistance. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 37 (1999)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 647-56

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:37:y:1999:i:4:p:647-56

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References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Mohapatra, Sandeep & Barrett, Christopher B. & Snyder, Donald L. & Biswas, Basudeb, 1998. "Does Food Aid Really Discourage Food Production?," Economics Research Institute, ERI Study Papers 28369, Utah State University, Economics Department.
  2. Blanchard, Olivier Jean, 1989. "A Traditional Interpretation of Macroeconomic Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 1146-64, December.
  3. Abbott, Philip C. & McCarthy, F. Desmond, 1982. "Welfare effects of tied food aid," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 63-79, August.
  4. Barrett, Christopher B & Mohapatra, Sandeep & Snyder, Donald L, 1999. "The Dynamic Effects of U.S. Food Aid," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(4), pages 647-56, October.
  5. Christopher B. Barrett, 1998. "Food Aid: Is It Development Assistance, Trade Promotion, Both, or Neither?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 566-571.
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Cited by:
  1. Kiawu, James AF & Jones, Keithly G, 2013. "Implications of food aid and remittances for West African food import demand," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(1), July.
  2. Barrett, C. B. & Heisey, K. C., 2002. "How effectively does multilateral food aid respond to fluctuating needs?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 477-491.
  3. SUWA-EISENMANN Akiko & VERDIER Thierry, 2007. "Aid and trade," Research Unit Working Papers 0709, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
  4. Marie-Francoise Calmette & Maureen Kilkenny, 2012. "Rural roads versus African famines," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 373-396, October.
  5. Barrett, Christopher B., 2002. "Food Aid Effectiveness: "It'S The Targeting, Stupid!"," Working Papers 14754, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  6. Barrett, Christopher B & Mohapatra, Sandeep & Snyder, Donald L, 1999. "The Dynamic Effects of U.S. Food Aid," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(4), pages 647-56, October.
  7. Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "Food Aid’s Intended and Unintended Consequences," Working Papers 06-05, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  8. Cardwell, Ryan T., 2008. "Food Aid and the WTO: Can New Rules Be Effective?," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 9(1).
  9. Abdulai, Awudu & Barrett, Christopher B. & Hazell, Peter, 2004. "Food aid for market development in Sub-Saharan Africa," DSGD discussion papers 5, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Titus O. Awokuse, 2006. "Assessing the Impact of Food Aid on Recipient Countries: A Survey," Working Papers 06-11, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  11. Lentz, Erin C. & Barrett, Christopher B., 2008. "Improving Food Aid: What Reforms Would Yield the Highest Payoff?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1152-1172, July.
  12. Barrett, Christopher B., 2002. "Food Aid And Commercial International Food Trade," Working Papers 14742, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.

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