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Improving Food Aid: What Reforms Would Yield the Highest Payoff?

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  • Lentz, Erin C.
  • Barrett, Christopher B.

Abstract

Summary This paper develops an integrated model of the food aid distribution chain, from donor appropriations through operational agency programming decisions to household consumption choices. We use this model to simulate alternative policies and to perform sensitivity analysis to establish how varying underlying conditions--for example, delivery costs, the political additionality of food, targeting efficacy--affect optimal food aid policy for improving the well-being of food insecure households. We find that improved targeting by operational agencies is crucial to advancing food security objectives. At the donor level, the key policy variable under most model parameterizations is ocean freight costs associated with cargo preference restrictions on the US food aid.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
Issue (Month): 7 (July)
Pages: 1152-1172

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:7:p:1152-1172

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References

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  1. Stephen Coate, 1987. "Cash Versus Direct Food Relief," Discussion Papers 724R, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  2. James Levinsohn & Margaret McMillan, 2005. "Does Food Aid Harm the Poor? Household Evidence from Ethiopia," NBER Working Papers 11048, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Barrett, Christopher B & Mohapatra, Sandeep & Snyder, Donald L, 1999. "The Dynamic Effects of U.S. Food Aid," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(4), pages 647-56, October.
  4. Singer, Hans & Wood, John & Jennings, Tony, 1987. "Food Aid: The Challenge and the Opportunity," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198285182, September.
  5. Clay, Daniel C. & Molla, Daniel & Habtewold, Debebe, 1999. "Food aid targeting in Ethiopia: A study of who needs it and who gets it," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 391-409, August.
  6. Barrett, Christopher B., 2006. "U.S. Food Aid: It’s Not Your Parents’ Program Any More!," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 24(1).
  7. Basu, Kaushik, 1996. "Relief programs: When it may be better to give food instead of cash," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 91-96, January.
  8. Jayne, T. S. & Strauss, John & Yamano, Takashi & Molla, Daniel, 2001. "Giving to the Poor? Targeting of Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 887-910, May.
  9. Christopher B. Barrett & Paul A. Dorosh, 1996. "Farmers' Welfare and Changing Food Prices: Nonparametric Evidence from Rice in Madagascar," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 656-669.
  10. Barrett, Christopher B., 2002. "Food security and food assistance programs," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 40, pages 2103-2190 Elsevier.
  11. Martens, Bertin, 1990. "The economics of triangular food aid transactions," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 13-26, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Sumberg, James & Sabates-Wheeler, Rachel, 2011. "Linking agricultural development to school feeding in sub-Saharan Africa: Theoretical perspectives," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 341-349, June.
  2. Lentz, Erin C. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Gómez, Miguel I. & Maxwell, Daniel G., 2013. "On The Choice and Impacts of Innovative International Food Assistance Instruments," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 1-8.

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