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Entry Level Salaries of Academic Economists: Does Gender or Age Matter?

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  • Formby, John P
  • Gunther, William D
  • Sakano, Ryoichi

Abstract

This study uses the results of a survey of entry-level economists to investigate whether gender or age influence beginning salaries once other determinants of earnings are taken into account. The authors consider and control for terminal degree status, the quality of Ph.D. granting and hiring departments, field of specialization, costs of living across areas, and other institutional factors that can influence academic salaries. Gender is found to have no significant effect. Age seems to matter but only in departments that have faculty who do not publish in top journals and only through interactions with other variables. Copyright 1993 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 31 (1993)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 128-38

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:31:y:1993:i:1:p:128-38

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Gallet, Craig A. & List, John A. & Orazem, Peter F., 2004. "Cyclicality and the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 1302, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Boppart, Timo & Staub, Kevin, 2012. "Online accessibility of academic articles and the diversity of economics," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62040, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  3. Nils Braakmann, 2008. "Fields of training, plant characteristics and the gender wage gap in entry wages among skilled workers– Evidence from German administrative data," Working Paper Series in Economics 90, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  4. Joao Ricardo Faria, 2000. "The Game Academics Play: Editors Versus Authors," Working Paper Series 105, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  5. Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 1999. "Salary and the Gender Salary Gap in the Academic Profession," IZA Discussion Papers 64, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Berg, Nathan & Faria, Joao, 2008. "Negatively correlated author seniority and the number of acknowledged people: Name-recognition as a signal of scientific merit?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1234-1247, June.
  7. Gallet, Craig A. & List, John A. & Orazem, Peter, 2004. "Cyclicality and the Labor Market for Economists," Staff General Research Papers 12025, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  8. John J. Siegfried & Wendy A. Stock, 1999. "The Labor Market for New Ph.D. Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 115-134, Summer.
  9. Nils Braakmann, 2013. "What Determines Wage Inequality Among Young German University Graduates?," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Statistics and Economics, vol. 233(2), pages 130-158, March.
  10. Wendy Stock & Richard Alston & Martin Milkman, 2000. "The academic labor market for economists: 1995–96," Atlantic Economic Journal, International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 28(2), pages 164-185, June.
  11. Nils Braakmann, 2008. "Non scholae, sed vitae discimus! - The importance of fields of study for the gender wage gap among German university graduates during labor market entry and the first years of their careers," Working Paper Series in Economics 85, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  12. Hannelore Weck-Hannemann, 2000. "Frauen in der Ökonomie und Frauenökonomik: Zur Erklärung geschlechtsspezifischer Unterschiede in der Wirtschaft und in den Wirtschaftswissenschaften," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 1(2), pages 199-220, 05.
  13. Toumanoff, Peter, 2005. "The effects of gender on salary-at-hire in the academic labor market," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 179-188, April.
  14. Casey Warman & Frances Woolley & Christopher Worswick, 2006. "The Evolution of Male-Female Wages Differentials in Canadian Universities: 1970-2001," Working Papers 1099, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  15. Toutkoushian, Robert K., 1998. "Sex Matters Less for Younger Faculty: Evidence of Disaggregate Pay Disparities from the 1988 and 1993 NCES Surveys," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 55-71, February.
  16. John P. Formby & Gary Hoover, 2002. "Salary Determinants of Entry-Level Academic Economists and the Characteristics of Those Hired on the Tenure Track," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 28(4), pages 509-522, Fall.

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