Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Is Germany’s Influence on Austria Waning?

Contents:

Author Info

Abstract

This study analyzes the connection between business cycle fluctuations in Germany and Austria as well as the transmission of German shocks to Austria. Compared to Austria’s links with other countries, the ties between Austria and Germany have loosened in relative terms in recent years; in terms of gross domestic product (GDP), however, a strong and steady increase has been recorded. Static and dynamic correlation measures point to a consistently high level of co-movement between Austria and Germany. While the Austrian economy lagged behind the German economy by one quarter in the 1970s, it now leads the German economy by one quarter. The Austrian economy’s reaction to German shocks equals 0.4 times the German reaction. Monetary policy shocks are transmitted with the greatest impact, while supply and demand shocks trigger a far less pronounced reaction in Austria. Over time, monetary policy shocks have gained slightly in importance, while German demand shocks have become less important. On average across shocks, the transmission effect shows a marginal weakening. The relative importance of Germany and the international environment in explaining the forecast error for Austrian GDP has increased somewhat over time, whereas the domestic contribution to the forecast error has declined. On the whole, it is not possible to identify a decline in Germany’s importance for the Austrian economy.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.oenb.at/dms/oenb/Publikationen/Volkswirtschaft/Monetary-Policy-and-the-Economy/2006/Monetary-Policy-and-the-Economy-Q2-06/chapters/mop_2006_2_02_tcm16-45582.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank) in its journal Monetary Policy & the Economy.

Volume (Year): (2006)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 24–45

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:onb:oenbmp:y:2006:i:2:b:2

Contact details of provider:
Postal: P.O. Box 61, A-1011 Vienna, Austria
Phone: +43/1/404 20 7405
Fax: +43/1/404 20 7499
Email:
Web page: http://www.oenb.at
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Postal: Oesterreichische Nationalbank, Documentation Management and Communications Services, Otto-Wagner Platz 3, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Email:

Related research

Keywords: business-cycle; synchronization; vector autoregression; shock-identification; transmission.;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Canova, Fabio, 2003. "The Transmission of US Shocks to Latin America," CEPR Discussion Papers 3963, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Fabio Canova & Gianni de Nicoló, 1999. "On the sources of business cycles in the G-7," Economics Working Papers 459, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Mar 2000.
  3. Yin-Wong Cheung & Frank Westermann, 1999. "An analysis of German effects on the Austrian business cycle," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 135(3), pages 522-531, September.
  4. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 1997. "Monetary policy shocks: what have we learned and to what end?," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues WP-97-18, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  5. Hochreiter, Eduard & Winckler, Georg, 1995. "The advantages of tying Austria's hands: The success of the hard currency strategy," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 83-111, March.
  6. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2003. "Has the business cycle changed?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 9-56.
  7. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. repec:onb:oenbwp:y::i:137:b:1 is not listed on IDEAS

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:onb:oenbmp:y:2006:i:2:b:2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Claudia Kwapil).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.