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Ideology and the size of US state government

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  • Andrew Pickering

    ()

  • James Rockey

    ()

Abstract

This paper theorizes that the impact of ideology on the size of US state governments increases with state income. This idea is tested using state-level ideology data derived from the voting behavior of state congressional representatives. Empirically the interaction of ideology and mean income is a key determinant of state government size. At 1960s levels of income the impact of ideology is negligible. At 1997 levels of income a one standard-deviation move towards the left of the ideology spectrum increases state government size by about half a standard deviation. Estimated income elasticities differentiated by state and time are found to be increasing with ideology and diminishing with income, as predicted by the theory. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

Volume (Year): 156 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 443-465

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Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:156:y:2013:i:3:p:443-465

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100332

Related research

Keywords: Ideology; Wagner’s law; Size of government; D72; H10;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Christian Bjørnskov & Niklas Potrafke, 2013. "The size and scope of government in the US states: does party ideology matter?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 20(4), pages 687-714, August.
  2. François Facchini & Mickaël Melki, 2013. "Political Ideology and Economic Growth: Evidence from the French Democracy," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 13077, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  3. Niklas Potrafke & Margret Schneider & Christian Simon, 2013. "Zum Einfluss von Parteiideologie auf die Staatstätigkeit in den US-Bundesstaaten," Ifo Schnelldienst, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(11), pages 24-29, 06.

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