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Reconsidering the Impact of the Environment on Long-run Growth when Pollution Influences Health and Agents have a Finite-lifetime

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  • X. Pautrel

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10640-007-9139-y
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists in its journal Environmental and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 40 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 (May)
Pages: 37-52

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Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:40:y:2008:i:1:p:37-52

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100263

Related research

Keywords: Growth; Environment; Overlapping generations; Human capital; Health;

References

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  1. Sandra Black & Paul Devereux & Kjell Salvanes, 2004. "Why the apple doesn't fall far: understanding intergenerational transmission of human capital," Working Paper Series 2004-12, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  2. Cees Withagen, 2001. "Endogenous Growth and Environmental Policy," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 32(1), pages 92-109.
  3. Evans, Mary F. & Smith, V. Kerry, 2005. "Do new health conditions support mortality-air pollution effects?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 496-518, November.
  4. Arnaud Chevalier, 2004. "Parental Education And Child's Education: A Natural Experiment," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 42, Royal Economic Society.
  5. Francesca Dominici & Jonathan M. Samet & Scott L. Zeger, 2000. "Combining evidence on air pollution and daily mortality from the 20 largest US cities: a hierarchical modelling strategy," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 163(3), pages 263-302.
  6. Philip Oreopoulos & Marianne E. Page & Ann Huff Stevens, 2003. "Does Human Capital Transfer from Parent to Child? The Intergenerational Effects of Compulsory Schooling," NBER Working Papers 10164, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Xavier Pautrel, 2009. "Health-enhancing Activities and the Environment: How Competition for Resources Makes the Environmental Policy Beneficial," Working Papers 2009.111, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  2. Carlotta Balestra & Davide Dottori, 2012. "Aging society, health and the environment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(3), pages 1045-1076, July.
  3. Aloi, Marta & Tournemaine, Frederic, 2011. "Growth effects of environmental policy when pollution affects health," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 1683-1695, July.
  4. Hirazawa, Makoto & Saito, Koichi & Yakita, Akira, 2011. "Effects of international sharing of pollution abatement burdens on income inequality among countries," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1615-1625, October.
  5. Wang, Min & Zhao, Jinhua & Bhattacharya, Joydeep, 2013. "Optimal Health and Environmental Policies in a Pollution-Growth Nexus," Staff General Research Papers 35994, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Eugenia Vella & Evangelos V. Dioikitopoulos & Sarantis Kalyvitis, 2012. "Green Spending Reforms, Growth and Welfare with Endogenous Subjective Discounting," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_045, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  7. Xavier Pautrel, 2007. "Pollution, Health and Life Expectancy: How Environmental Policy Can Promote Growth," Working Papers 2007.96, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  8. Natacha Raffin & Thomas Seegmuller, 2014. "The Cost of Pollution on Longevity, Welfare and Economic Stability," AMSE Working Papers 1433, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised 16 Jul 2014.

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