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Effects of positive attitude and optimism on wage and employment: A double selection approach

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  • Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
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    Abstract

    Using two samples from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), a longitudinal data set from the United States, and following a double selection approach, the current study estimates the worker's employment and wage equations simultaneously with positive attitude and optimism as additional explanatory variables. Modeling employment as a bivariate decision process, the study examines different factors that influence the worker's labor market participation decision, the employer's hiring decision and the wage rate. The study finds the evidence that the worker's positive attitude and optimism affect the worker's employment probability from different angles: the former through the participation decision and the latter through the hiring decision. Following an alternative approach, this study also provides strong support to the earlier finding that positive attitude affects the worker's wage positively. Interestingly, the effects of attitude variables on the worker's wage are found to be quite comparable in magnitude to the wage effects of the traditional human capital variables.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

    Volume (Year): 41 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 304-316

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:41:y:2012:i:3:p:304-316

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

    Related research

    Keywords: Positive attitude; Optimism; Bivariate probit; Partial observability; Double selection;

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