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What determines the stock market's reaction to monetary policy statements?

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  • Kurov, Alexander

Abstract

We find that information communicated through monetary policy statements has important business cycle dependent implications for stock prices. For example, during periods of economic expansion, stocks tend to respond negatively to announcements of higher rates ahead. In recessions, however, we find a strong positive reaction of stocks to seemingly similar signals of future monetary tightening. We provide evidence that the state dependence in the stock market's response is explained by information about the expected equity premium and future corporate cash flows contained in monetary policy statements. We also show state dependence in the average stock returns on days of scheduled FOMC meetings and in the impact of monetary policy statements on stock and bond return volatility.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Review of Financial Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 175-187

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Handle: RePEc:eee:revfin:v:21:y:2012:i:4:p:175-187

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620170

Related research

Keywords: Monetary policy; FOMC statements; Stock market; Business cycle;

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