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Categorization by groups and individuals

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  • Hamilton, Rebecca W.
  • Puntoni, Stefano
  • Tavassoli, Nader T.
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    Abstract

    Categorization is a core psychological process that is central to decision making. While a substantial amount of research has been conducted to examine individual categorization behavior, little is known about how the outputs of individual and group categorization may differ. Four experiments demonstrate that group categorization differs systematically from individual categorization in the structural dimension of category breadth: categorizing the same set of items, groups tend to create a larger number of smaller categories than individuals. This effect of social context is a function of both taskwork and teamwork. In terms of taskwork, groups' greater available knowledge mediates differences in category breadth between individuals and groups by increasing utilized knowledge (study 2). In terms of teamwork, task conflict moderates the effect of social context on category breadth (study 3). Moreover, the experience of categorizing individually or in a group influences individuals' subsequent judgments (study 4).

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WP2-4YDR2FR-1/2/d2f7fa7aaa11b4dd84dd6d81e9b66114
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 112 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (May)
    Pages: 70-81

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:112:y:2010:i:1:p:70-81

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

    Related research

    Keywords: Categorization Group processes Prior knowledge Task conflict Category breadth;

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    1. Mitchell, Andrew A & Dacin, Peter A, 1996. " The Assessment of Alternative Measures of Consumer Expertise," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(3), pages 219-39, December.
    2. Mohammed, Susan & Ringseis, Erika, 2001. "Cognitive Diversity and Consensus in Group Decision Making: The Role of Inputs, Processes, and Outcomes," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 310-335, July.
    3. Bonner, Bryan L. & Baumann, Michael R. & Dalal, Reeshad S., 2002. "The effects of member expertise on group decision-making and performance," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 719-736, July.
    4. Hambley, Laura A. & O'Neill, Thomas A. & Kline, Theresa J.B., 2007. "Virtual team leadership: The effects of leadership style and communication medium on team interaction styles and outcomes," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 1-20, May.
    5. Sujan, Mita, 1985. " Consumer Knowledge: Effects on Evaluation Strategies Mediating Consumer Judgments," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(1), pages 31-46, June.
    6. Fragale, Alison R. & Rosen, Benson & Xu, Carol & Merideth, Iryna, 2009. "The higher they are, the harder they fall: The effects of wrongdoer status on observer punishment recommendations and intentionality attributions," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 53-65, January.
    7. Cowley, Elizabeth & Mitchell, Andrew A, 2003. " The Moderating Effect of Product Knowledge on the Learning and Organization of Product Information," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(3), pages 443-54, December.
    8. Meyers-Levy, Joan & Tybout, Alice M, 1989. " Schema Congruity as a Basis for Product Evaluation," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(1), pages 39-54, June.
    9. Abbie Griffin & John R. Hauser, 1993. "The Voice of the Customer," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 12(1), pages 1-27.
    10. van Ginkel, Wendy P. & van Knippenberg, Daan, 2008. "Group information elaboration and group decision making: The role of shared task representations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 82-97, January.
    11. Alba, Joseph W & Hutchinson, J Wesley, 1987. " Dimensions of Consumer Expertise," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(4), pages 411-54, March.
    12. Walsh, James P. & Henderson, Caroline M. & Deighton, John, 1988. "Negotiated belief structures and decision performance: An empirical investigation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 194-216, October.
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