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Variation in retail costs for fresh vegetables and salty snacks across communities in the United States

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  • Stewart, Hayden
  • Dong, Diansheng

Abstract

Households living in different communities pay different amounts of money for food. Food costs depend on whether a household lives in an urban community or in a locality with a high incidence of poverty, among other factors. This study focuses on spatial variation across the United States in the retail costs for fresh vegetables and salty snacks. Findings reveal that the major economic and demographic characteristics of a household's community affect its costs for these two types of foods differently. However, households are likely to pay more money for salty snacks in communities where fresh vegetables also cost more.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

Volume (Year): 36 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 128-135

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:36:y:2011:i:2:p:128-135

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

Related research

Keywords: Food prices Fresh vegetables Price dispersion Snack foods;

References

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  1. Lewbel, Arthur, 1996. "Aggregation without Separability: A Generalized Composite Commodity Theorem," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 524-43, June.
  2. Bresnahan, Timothy F & Reiss, Peter C, 1991. "Entry and Competition in Concentrated Markets," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(5), pages 977-1009, October.
  3. Graddy, Kathryn, 1997. "Do Fast-Food Chains Price Discriminate on the Race and Income Characteristics of an Area?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(4), pages 391-401, October.
  4. Hayden Stewart & David E. Davis, 2005. "Price Dispersion and Accessibility: A Case Study of Fast Food," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(4), pages 784-799, April.
  5. Alcaly, Roger E & Klevorick, Alvin K, 1971. "Food Prices in Relation to Income Levels in New York City," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(4), pages 380-97, October.
  6. Fred Kuchler & Abebayehu Tegene & J. Michael Harris, 2005. "Taxing Snack Foods: Manipulating Diet Quality or Financing Information Programs?," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 4-20.
  7. Kaufman, Phillip R. & MacDonald, James M. & Lutz, Steve M. & Smallwood, David M., 1997. "Do the Poor Pay More for Food? Item Selection and Price Differences Affect Low-Income Household Food Costs," Agricultural Economics Reports 34065, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  8. Capozza, Dennis R & Van Order, Robert, 1978. "A Generalized Model of Spatial Competition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(5), pages 896-908, December.
  9. Frankel, David M. & Gould, Eric D., 2001. "The Retail Price of Inequality," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 219-239, March.
  10. Steven C. Salop, 1979. "Monopolistic Competition with Outside Goods," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(1), pages 141-156, Spring.
  11. Diansheng Dong & J.S. Shonkwiler & Oral Capps, 1998. "Estimation of Demand Functions Using Cross-Sectional Household Data: The Problem Revisited," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 466-473.
  12. Hayden Stewart & Noel Blisard, 2008. "Who Pays More for Food?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(1), pages 150-168, 02.
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Cited by:
  1. Damon, Amy L. & King, Robert P. & Leibtag, Ephraim, 2013. "First of the month effect: Does it apply across food retail channels?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 18-27.

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