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On the adoption of electricity as a domestic source by Mozambican households

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  • Arthur, Maria de Fatima S.R.
  • Zahran, Sammy
  • Bucini, Gabriela
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    Abstract

    In Mozambique, domestic energy is often composed of a mix of sources, primarily used for lighting and cooking, with biomass and kerosene as more common sources. Electrification programs, intended to connect new consumers countrywide, have not significantly contributed either to the intensification of electricity consumption or to the reduction of the use of biomass in households. The choice of energy source is dependent on price and on the capability of the household to invest in energy-consuming appliances. Based on the data from a household survey carried out in Mozambique during 2002/03, this paper analyzes the geographic differences in unit expenditures for domestic energy and finds evidence of an inverted energy ladder with prices of useful energy units. The data show that biomass sources are often more expensive per unit of useful energy than higher-grade sources, supporting arguments favoring electrification as a poverty alleviation strategy. In addition, this study estimates the likelihood of poor households transitioning from biomass to electricity consumption based on various factors. Results indicate that income is not a determining factor in the transition, but wealth and the level of the Primary Energy Consumption Share (PECS) are as important factors as the nature of the energy mix.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 38 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 11 (November)
    Pages: 7235-7249

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:38:y:2010:i:11:p:7235-7249

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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    Keywords: Domestic electricity Likelihoods Energy ladder;

    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Maes, Wouter H. & Verbist, Bruno, 2012. "Increasing the sustainability of household cooking in developing countries: Policy implications," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 4204-4221.
    2. Arthur, Maria de Fátima S.R. & Bond, Craig A. & Willson, Bryan, 2012. "Estimation of elasticities for domestic energy demand in Mozambique," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 398-409.
    3. Alem, Yonas & Hassen, Sied & Kohlin, Gunnar, 2013. "The Dynamics of Electric Cookstove Adoption: Panel Data Evidence from Ethiopia," Discussion Papers dp-13-03-efd, Resources For the Future.
    4. Keirstead, James & Jennings, Mark & Sivakumar, Aruna, 2012. "A review of urban energy system models: Approaches, challenges and opportunities," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(6), pages 3847-3866.
    5. Schut, Marc & van Paassen, Annemarie & Leeuwis, Cees & Bos, Sandra & Leonardo, Wilson & Lerner, Anna, 2011. "Space for innovation for sustainable community-based biofuel production and use: Lessons learned for policy from Nhambita community, Mozambique," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 5116-5128, September.

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