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Labour market outcomes for people with a spinal cord injury

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  • Rowell, David
  • Connelly, Luke

Abstract

The consequences of spinal cord injury are profound and extend well beyond the immediate loss of mobility and sensation. Employment is a well-recognised rehabilitation goal. In this study, we examine the impact of a publicly funded "package" of services that is designed to enable people with a spinal cord injury to return to the workplace. Specifically, this package of services provided client directed assistance for assisting the recipient with the activities of daily living (e.g., bathing, food preparation, etc.). We combine primary data collection methods well developed in other scientific disciplines, but less frequently utilised within economics, with traditional econometric techniques, to present a novel approach to this methodological issue. The Spinal Injuries Survey Instrument was developed and administered using a matched sampling approach. Collected data included, labour market outcomes, exposure to the packages, as well as clinical and demographic covariates commonly identified by the spinal cord injury literature. Concern for endogeneity was addressed by collecting data on several variables that might serve as suitable instruments for the econometric work and measures of otherwise-unobserved sources of heterogeneity. For example, a psychological measure of "attributional style was adapted from the field of psychology in order to control for a potentially confounding source of latent individual heterogeneity, viz. "motivation". While our results find zero marginal effect of support packages on labour market outcomes, we find that training undertaken post-injury and age are both positively correlated with labour market participation.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 8 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (July)
Pages: 223-232

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:8:y:2010:i:2:p:223-232

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

Related research

Keywords: Spinal cord injury Employment Endogeneity;

References

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  1. H. Shelton Brown & José A. Pagán & Elena Bastida, 2005. "The impact of diabetes on employment: genetic IVs in a bivariate probit," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(5), pages 537-544.
  2. Alan Krueger & Douglas Kruse, 1995. "Labor Market Effects of Spinal Cord Injuries in the Dawn of the Computer Age," Working Papers 728, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. repec:fth:prinin:349 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  5. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1994. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," NBER Technical Working Papers 0151, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Laura Greene Knapp & Terry Seaks, 1998. "A Hausman test for a dummy variable in probit," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(5), pages 321-323.
  7. Dranove, David & Wehner, Paul, 1994. "Physician-induced demand for childbirths," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 61-73, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Brady, Gerard, 2013. "Network social capital and labour market outcomes Evidence from Ireland," MPRA Paper 47391, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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