Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The role of computer use and English proficiency in gender wage inequality: Taiwanese evidence

Contents:

Author Info

  • Hsin-Fan Chen

    ()
    (Department of Applied Economics, National Chung-Hsing University, Taiwan)

  • Long-Hwa Chen

    ()
    (Department of Applied Economics, National Chung-Hsing University, Taiwan and Department of Economics, Aarhus School of Business, University of Aarhus)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper uses the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition and accounts for potential identification bias in order to shed light on the role of computer use as well as English ability on the gender wage differential in Taiwan. The results show that both computer use and English proficiency benefit female wage earners and contribute to an equalization of the gender wage gap.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/EB/2007/Volume10/EB-07J70004A.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): 10 (2007)
    Issue (Month): 16 ()
    Pages: 1-9

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07j70004

    Contact details of provider:

    Related research

    Keywords: Computer Use;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Peter Dolton & Gerry Makepeace & Helen Robinson, 2007. "Use IT or Lose IT? The Impact of Computers on Earnings," CEE Discussion Papers 0082, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    2. Liu, Jin-Tan & Tsou, Meng-Wen & Hammitt, James K., 2004. "Computer use and wages: evidence from Taiwan," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 43-51, January.
    3. Krueger, Alan B, 1993. "How Computers Have Changed the Wage Structure: Evidence from Microdata, 1984-1989," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 108(1), pages 33-60, February.
    4. Makepeace, Gerry & Peter Dolton, 2003. "Computer use and earnings in Britain," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 146, Royal Economic Society.
    5. Sarbani Banerjee & Rama Parai & Amar Parai, 2007. "Computer use and wage differentials: US and foreign born male and female workers," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 409-413.
    6. Brown, Charles & Corcoran, Mary, 1997. "Sex-Based Differences in School Content and the Male-Female Wage Gap," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages 431-65, July.
    7. William C. Horrace & Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2001. "Inter-industry wage differentials and the gender wage gap: An identification problem," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(3), pages 611-618, April.
    8. Judith Fields & Edward N. Wolff, 1995. "Interindustry wage differentials and the gender wage gap," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(1), pages 105-120, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-07j70004. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.