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Arms Export Controls, Subsidies And The Wto Exemption

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  • María del Carmen García-Alonso
  • Paul Levine

Abstract

Owing to the World Trade Organization (WTO) exemption that allows governments to subsidize arms exports, the arms trade is one of the few remaining areas of trade where we observe export subsidies. This paper examines the effect of arms controls, in the form of licensing delays, on the incentives to subsidize arms exports and conversely the effect of the WTO arms trade exemption on the incentives to break arms control agreements. Our main result is that arms controls and free trade commitments re-enforce each other. Licensing delays reduce the incentive to subsidise and free trade without subsidies reduces the benefits of a unilateral abrogation of arms controls. Transparency actually worsens the Nash inefficiencies at play in that incomplete information leads to lower subsidies and lower arms exports. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2005.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Scottish Economic Society in its journal Scottish Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 52 (2005)
Issue (Month): 2 (05)
Pages: 305-322

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Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:2:p:305-322

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  1. Anton, James J. & Gertler, Paul J., 1988. "External markets and regulation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 243-260, November.
  2. S. Lael Brainard & David Martimort, 1992. "Strategic Trade Policy With Incompletely Informed Policymakers," NBER Working Papers 4069, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Levine, Paul & Smith, Ron, 2000. "The Arms Trade Game: From Laissez-Faire to a Common Defence Policy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(2), pages 357-80, April.
  4. Paul Levine & Fotis Mouzakis & Ron Smith, 2000. "Arms export controls and emerging domestic producers," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 505-531.
  5. James A. Brander & Barbara J. Spencer, 1984. "Export Subsidies and International Market Share Rivalry," NBER Working Papers 1464, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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