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Do New Economic Geography agglomeration shadows underlie current population dynamics across the urban hierarchy?

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Author Info

  • Mark D. Partridge
  • Dan S. Rickman
  • Kamar Ali
  • M. Rose Olfert

Abstract

Although the New Economic Geography (NEG) has been used extensively to formally explain the emergence of the American urban system, few studies investigate its success in explaining current population dynamics in a more established urban system. This study explores whether proximity to same-sized and higher-tiered urban centres affected the patterns of 1990-2006 US county population growth. Rather than casting NEG agglomeration shadows on nearby growth, larger urban centres generally appear to have positive growth effects for more proximate places of less than 250,000 people. However, there is some evidence the largest urban areas cast growth shadows on proximate medium-sized metropolitan areas and of spatial competition among small metropolitan areas. Copyright (c) 2009 the author(s). Journal compilation (c) 2009 RSAI.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Papers in Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 88 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (06)
Pages: 445-466

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Handle: RePEc:bla:presci:v:88:y:2009:i:2:p:445-466

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Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1056-8190

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Cited by:
  1. Kristian Behrens & Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 2009. "Survival of the Fittest in Cities: Agglomeration, Polarization, and Income Inequality," Cahiers de recherche 0919, CIRPEE.
  2. Hannu Tervo, 2011. "Cities, hinterlands and agglomeration shadows: spatial developments in Finland over 1880-2004," ERSA conference papers ersa10p147, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Kim, Ho Yeon, 2012. "Shrinking population and the urban hierarchy," IDE Discussion Papers 360, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
  4. Tervo, Hannu, 2010. "Cities, hinterlands and agglomeration shadows: Spatial developments in Finland during 1880-2004," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 476-486, October.
  5. Tripathi, Sabyasachi, 2012. "Do large agglomerations lead to economic growth? evidence from urban India," MPRA Paper 38227, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Daniel Liviano & Josep-Maria Arauzo-Carod, 2012. "Spatial Exploration of Age Distribution in Catalan Municipalities," ERSA conference papers ersa12p81, European Regional Science Association.
  7. Heather M. Stephens & Mark D. Partridge, 2011. "Do Entrepreneurs Enhance Economic Growth in Lagging Regions?," Growth and Change, Gatton College of Business and Economics, University of Kentucky, vol. 42(4), pages 431-465, December.

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