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Adoption of chemical fertilizer by smallholder farmers in the peanut basin of Senegal

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  • Thuo, Mary
  • Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.
  • Hathie, Ibrahima
  • Obeng-Asiedu, Patrick
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    Abstract

    Farm productivity in the Peanut Basin of Senegal has been declining over time, requiring strategic interventions to reverse this trend. Using pooled cross-section time-series data and probit and Tobit models, this paper examines factors that influence the decision whether or not to use fertilizer (adoption) and the share of land on which fertilizer is used (intensity) in peanut and millet production. Our results show that the probability of using fertilizer increases where household heads have higher literacy, larger families and larger farms, but decreases where they have off-farm income. Fertilizer use is also positively associated with the amount of rainfall and varies by geographical location. The analysis indicates that both the adoption and the intensity of use of fertilizer by peanut and millet farmers have been declining over the study period 1998–2005. Our findings suggest that focusing on market oriented interventions that motivate farmers to invest in improved agricultural technologies is a sensible policy option.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by African Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

    Volume (Year): 06 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:156960

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    Related research

    Keywords: adoption; use intensity; chemical fertilizer; peanut; millet; Crop Production/Industries; Q16;

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    3. Gregory Amacher & Jeffrey Alwang, 2004. "Productivity and Land Enhancing Technologies in Northern Ethiopia: Health, Public Investments, and Sequential Adoption," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(2), pages 321-331.
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    6. Ephraim Nkonya & Ted Schroeder & David Norman, 1997. "Factors Affecting Adoption Of Improved Maize Seed And Fertiliser In Northern Tanzania," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(1-3), pages 1-12.
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    12. Wozniak, Gregory D, 1984. "The Adoption of Interrelated Innovations: A Human Capital Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(1), pages 70-79, February.
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    14. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
    15. Sunding, David & Zilberman, David, 2001. "The agricultural innovation process: Research and technology adoption in a changing agricultural sector," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 207-261 Elsevier.
    16. Doss, Cheryl R. & Mwangi, Wilfred & Verkuijl, Hugo & De Groote, Hugo, 2003. "Adoption Of Maize And Wheat Technologies In Eastern Africa: A Synthesis Of The Findings Of 22 Case Studies," Economics Working Papers 46522, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
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