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Trade Flow Dynamics with Heterogeneous Firms

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  • Fabio Ghironi
  • Marc J. Melitz

Abstract

We use a two-country, stochastic, general equilibrium model of international trade and macroeconomic dynamics with monopolistic competition and heterogeneous firms to explore the role of entry in the domestic economy and the extensive margin of international trade in the dynamics of U.S. trade flows over the business cycle. We show that the model can reproduce the evidence on the cyclicality of U.S. trade and important features of the evidence on the extensive margins of domestic entry and international trade. Entry in the domestic economy and the implied differences in the timing of export and import expansions in response to favorable productivity shocks provide the key mechanism for the model's ability to explain this range of stylized facts.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 97 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 356-361

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:97:y:2007:i:2:p:356-361

Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.97.2.356
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References

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  1. Devereux, Michael B. & Head, Allen C. & Lapham, Beverly J., 1996. "Aggregate fluctuations with increasing returns to specialization and scale," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 627-656, April.
  2. Timothy J. Kehoe & Kim J. Ruhl, 2009. "How important is the new goods margin in international trade?," Staff Report 324, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  3. Robert C. Feenstra & John Romalis & Peter K. Schott, 2002. "U.S. Imports, Exports, and Tariff Data, 1989-2001," NBER Working Papers 9387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Satyajit Chatterjee & Russell W. Cooper, 1993. "Entry and exit, product variety and the business cycle," Working Papers 93-30, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
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Cited by:
  1. Roc Armenter & Miklós Koren, 2009. "Economies of Scale and the Size of Exporters," CeFiG Working Papers 7, Center for Firms in the Global Economy, revised 12 Mar 2009.
  2. Engel, Charles & Wang, Jian, 2011. "International trade in durable goods: Understanding volatility, cyclicality, and elasticities," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1), pages 37-52, January.
  3. Mario Larch , & Wolfgang Lechthaler, 2011. "Whom to Send to Doha? The Shortsighted Ones!," Kiel Working Papers 1695, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  4. Horag Choi & George Alessandria, 2009. "The Role of Exporting and Trade for Entry over the Business Cycle," 2009 Meeting Papers 355, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. Ching-Yi Lin & Paul Bergin, 2011. "The Dynamic Effects of Currency Union on Trade," 2011 Meeting Papers 291, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Horag Choi, 2013. "The Role of Establishment Heterogeneity in the Recovery from Sudden Stops," 2013 Meeting Papers 509, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Clarke, George R.G., 2008. "Has the internet increased exports for firms from low and middle-income countries," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 16-37, March.
  8. Fabio Ghironi & Viktors Stebunovs, 2010. "The Domestic and International Effects of Interstate U.S. Banking," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 765, Boston College Department of Economics.
  9. Charles Engel & Jian Wang, 2007. "International trade in durable goods: understanding volatility, cyclicality, and elastics," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 03, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  10. Enrique Martinez-Garcia & Jens Sondergaard, 2009. "Investment and trade patterns in a sticky-price, open-economy model," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 28, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  11. Faia, Ester, 2012. "Oligopolistic competition and optimal monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 1760-1774.
  12. Oladi, Reza & Beladi, Hamid, 2010. "On technical progress and the boundary of non-traded goods," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 204-209, November.
  13. Friberg, Richard & Paterson, Robert W & Richardson, Andrew D, 2010. "Why is there a home bias? A case study of Wine," CEPR Discussion Papers 7885, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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