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Citations for "On Testing for Full Insurance Using Consumer Expenditure Survey Data: Comment"

by Nelson, Julie A

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  1. Orazio P. Attanasio & Guglielmo Weber, 2010. "Consumption and Saving: Models of Intertemporal Allocation and Their Implications for Public Policy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(3), pages 693-751, September.
  2. Heathcote, Jonathan & Perri, Fabrizio & Violante, Giovanni L, 2009. "Unequal We Stand: An Empirical Analysis of Economic Inequality in the United States, 1967-2006," CEPR Discussion Papers 7538, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Jae Won Lee, 2011. "Aggregate Implications of Heterogeneous Households in a Sticky-Price Model," Departmental Working Papers 201132, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  4. Eric M. Engen & Jonathan Gruber, 1995. "Unemployment Insurance and Precautionary Saving," NBER Working Papers 5252, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Gervais, Martin & Klein, Paul, 2010. "Measuring consumption smoothing in CEX data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(8), pages 988-999, November.
  6. Kohara, Miki & Ohtake, Fumio & Saito, Makoto, 2001. "A Test of the Full Insurance Hypothesis: The Case of Japan," Discussion Papers 2001-05, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
  7. Jae Won Lee, 2014. "Monetary Policy with Heterogeneous Households and Imperfect Risk-Sharing," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(3), pages 505-522, July.
  8. Dehejia, Rajeev & DeLeire, Thomas & Luttmer, Erzo F.P., 2007. "Insuring consumption and happiness through religious organizations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1-2), pages 259-279, February.
  9. Cogley, Timothy, 2002. "Idiosyncratic risk and the equity premium: evidence from the consumer expenditure survey," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 309-334, March.
  10. Dirk Krueger & Fabrizio Perri, 2005. "Does income inequality lead to consumption equality? evidence and theory," Staff Report 363, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  11. Jonathan A. Parker & Bruce Preston, 2005. "Precautionary Saving and Consumption Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1119-1143, September.
  12. Hai, Rong & Krueger, Dirk & Postlewaite, Andrew, 2013. "On the Welfare Cost of Consumption Fluctuations in the Presence of Memorable Goods," CEPR Discussion Papers 9623, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Engen, Eric M. & Gruber, Jonathan, 2001. "Unemployment insurance and precautionary saving," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 545-579, June.
  14. Hess, Gregory D. & Shin, Kwanho, 2000. "Risk sharing by households within and across regions and industries," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 533-560, June.
  15. Krueger, Dirk & Perri, Fabrizio, 2011. "Public versus private risk sharing," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(3), pages 920-956, May.
  16. Takagi, Shingo, 1999. "Bias in maximum likelihood estimator of disequilibrium and sample selection model with error-ridden observations," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 161-165, August.
  17. Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "Consumption smoothing during the economic transition in Bulgaria," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 328-347, June.
  18. Fatih Guvenen, 2011. "Macroeconomics With Heterogeneity: A Practical Guide," NBER Working Papers 17622, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Asdrubali, Pierfederico & Tedeschi, Simone & Ventura, Luigi, 2015. "Household Risksharing Channels," MPRA Paper 65906, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  20. Young Chun, 2001. "The Redistributive Effect of Risky Taxation," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 433-454, August.
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