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Aid fragmentation and donor coordination in Uganda: A district-level analysis

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Listed:
  • Nunnenkamp, Peter
  • Rank, Michaela
  • Thiele, Rainer

Abstract

Aid proliferation and a lack of coordination are widely recognized as serious problems for aid effectiveness, and donors have repeatedly promised to tackle them, e.g. in the Paris Declaration in 2005 and the Accra Agenda for Action in 2008. In this paper, we employ geocoded aid data from Uganda to assess whether the country's donors have increasingly specialized and better coordinated their aid activities at the district and sector level. Our findings point in the opposite direction: over the period 2006-2013, aid of most major donors in Uganda became more fragmented, and the duplication of aid efforts increased. There is tentative evidence that donors were more active in poorer parts of the country, which would provide some justification for clustered aid activities.

Suggested Citation

  • Nunnenkamp, Peter & Rank, Michaela & Thiele, Rainer, 2015. "Aid fragmentation and donor coordination in Uganda: A district-level analysis," Kiel Working Papers 2001, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:2001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Nunnenkamp & Hannes Öhler & Rainer Thiele, 2013. "Donor coordination and specialization: did the Paris Declaration make a difference?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(3), pages 537-563, September.
    2. Arnab Acharya & Ana Teresa Fuzzo de Lima & Mick Moore, 2006. "Proliferation and fragmentation: Transactions costs and the value of aid," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(1), pages 1-21.
    3. Findley, Michael G. & Powell, Josh & Strandow, Daniel & Tanner, Jeff, 2011. "The Localized Geography of Foreign Aid: A New Dataset and Application to Violent Armed Conflict," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 1995-2009.
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    Keywords

    aid fragmentation; donor coordination; Uganda;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid

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