IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/diedps/42020.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Digitalisation and its impact on SME finance in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reviewing the hype and actual developments

Author

Listed:
  • Disse, Sabrina
  • Sommer, Christoph

Abstract

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are pivotal for inclusive economic development, but suffer disproportionally from institutional and market failures, especially from constrained access to external finance. Digitalisation of the financial industry is often seen as a game changer. This paper aims to answer the question what the role is of digital financial instruments in SME finance in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It discusses the opportunities and challenges of digital advances for SME finance in general and of three specific financing instruments in Sub-Saharan Africa, namely mobile money (including digital credits), crowdfunding (including peer-to-peer lending) and public equity, in order to contrast the hype around digital finance with actual market developments and trends. Over 90 per cent of firms are small and medium-sized enterprises employing more than half of the formal workforce worldwide and more than 60 per cent in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). SMEs also account for most of the new jobs created (or at least as much as larger firms). They create economic opportunities such as employment, skill development and upward mobility in diverse geographic areas and economic sectors, and provide a livelihood and income for diverse segments of the labour force, including low-skilled workers as well as disadvantaged and marginalised groups such as young people, women and minorities. Hence, SMEs can foster inclusive economic development and subsequently contribute to social cohesion. A substantial share of national value added is attributed to SMEs and the SME segment is strongly and positively associated with economic growth (even though no causality can be claimed in this respect) and economic diversification. SMEs are also vital for advances in productivity and innovation, as small and young firms may introduce new, efficient technologies or - especially important for LMICs -make small modifications in order to adapt innovations to the local or national contexts or benefit from knowledge spillover. In short, SMEs play a crucial role for economic development. (...)

Suggested Citation

  • Disse, Sabrina & Sommer, Christoph, 2020. "Digitalisation and its impact on SME finance in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reviewing the hype and actual developments," Discussion Papers 4/2020, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:diedps:42020
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/215546/1/169348305X.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Berger, Allen N & Hancock, Diana & Marquardt, Jeffrey C, 1996. "A Framework for Analyzing Efficiency, Risks, Costs, and Innovations in the Payments System," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 696-732, November.
    2. Chang-Tai Hsieh & Peter J. Klenow, 2009. "Misallocation and Manufacturing TFP in China and India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1403-1448.
    3. Nicholas Bloom & Aprajit Mahajan & David McKenzie & John Roberts, 2010. "Why Do Firms in Developing Countries Have Low Productivity?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 619-623, May.
    4. Irani Arráiz & Marcela Meléndez & Rodolfo Stucchi, 2014. "Partial credit guarantees and firm performance: evidence from Colombia," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 711-724, October.
    5. Aggarwal, Nidhi & Susan Thomas, 2017. "Response of firms to listing: Evidence from SME exchanges," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2017-022, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    6. Kersten, Renate & Harms, Job & Liket, Kellie & Maas, Karen, 2017. "Small Firms, large Impact? A systematic review of the SME Finance Literature," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 330-348.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Kersten, Renate & Harms, Job & Liket, Kellie & Maas, Karen, 2017. "Small Firms, large Impact? A systematic review of the SME Finance Literature," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 330-348.
    2. Axel Demenet, 2016. "Does Managerial Capital also Matter Among Micro and Small Firms in Developing Countries?," Working Papers DT/2016/12, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    3. Axel Demenet & Quynh Hoang, 2018. "How important are management practices for the productivity of small and medium enterprises?," WIDER Working Paper Series 69, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Diego Restuccia, 2019. "Misallocation and aggregate productivity across time and space," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 52(1), pages 5-32, February.
    5. Sanghamitra Das & Kala Krishna & Sergey Lychagin & Rohini Somanathan, 2013. "Back on the Rails: Competition and Productivity in State-Owned Industry," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 136-162, January.
    6. Alistair Dieppe, 2020. "Global Productivity," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 34015, November.
    7. Robert T. Jensen & Nolan H. Miller, 2018. "Market Integration, Demand and the Growth of Firms: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in India," Working Papers id:12824, eSocialSciences.
    8. Figal Garone, Lucas & López Villalba, Paula A. & Maffioli, Alessandro & Ruzzier, Christian A., 2020. "Firm-level productivity in Latin America and the Caribbean," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 186-192.
    9. Heinrich, Torsten & Yang, Jangho & Dai, Shuanping, 2020. "Growth, development, and structural change at the firm-level: The example of the PR China," MPRA Paper 105011, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Maloney, William F. & Sarrias, Mauricio, 2017. "Convergence to the managerial frontier," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 284-306.
    11. Hau, Harald & Huang, Yi & Wang, Gewei, 2016. "Firm Response to Competitive Shocks: Evidence from China's Minimum Wage Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 11429, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Butler, Ines & Giuliodori, David & Guiñazu, Sebastian & Martinez Correa, Julian & Rodríguez, Alejandro, 2017. "Programas de Financiamiento Productivo a pymes, acceso al crédito y desempeño de las firmas: Evidencia de Argentina [Productive programs for SMEs, access to credit and performance of firms: evidenc," MPRA Paper 83524, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Mario Villalpando, 2014. "Bank Credit and Productivity: Evidence from Mexican Firms," Remef - The Mexican Journal of Economics and Finance, Instituto Mexicano de Ejecutivos de Finanzas. Remef, October.
    14. Lucas Figal Garone & Paula A. López Villalba & Alessandro Maffioli & Christian A. Ruzzier, 2020. "Productivity differences among firms in Latin American and the Caribbean," Working Papers 136, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Jan 2020.
    15. Rothenberg, Alexander D. & Gaduh, Arya & Burger, Nicholas E. & Chazali, Charina & Tjandraningsih, Indrasari & Radikun, Rini & Sutera, Cole & Weilant, Sarah, 2016. "Rethinking Indonesia’s Informal Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 96-113.
    16. Axel Demenet & Quynh Hoang, 2018. "How important are management practices for the productivity of small and medium enterprises?," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-69, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    17. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-94 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Lashitew, Addisu A., 2017. "The Uneven Effect of Financial Constraints: Size, Public Ownership, and Firm Investment in Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 178-198.
    19. Torsten Heinrich & Jangho Yang & Shuanping Dai, 2020. "Growth, development, and structural change at the firm-level: The example of the PR China," Papers 2012.14503, arXiv.org.
    20. Abhay Aneja & Nirupama Kulkarni & S.K. Ritadhi, 2021. "Consumption Tax Reform and the Real Economy: Evidence from India’s Adoption of a Value-Added Tax," Working Papers 48, Ashoka University, Department of Economics.
    21. Simeon D. Alder, 2016. "In the Wrong Hands: Complementarities, Resource Allocation, and TFP," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 199-241, January.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:diedps:42020. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ditubde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.