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Comparative Perspectives on Child poverty: a review of poverty measures

Author

Listed:
  • Howard White

    (Institute of Development Studies)

  • Andrew Masters

    (Institute of Development Studies)

  • Jennifer Leavy

    (Institute of Development Studies)

Abstract

Child poverty matters directly as children constitute a large share of the population and indirectly for future individual and national well- being. Developed country measures of child poverty are dominated by income-poverty, although health and education are often included. But these are not necessarily the most direct measures of the things that matter to children. Moreover, a broader range of factors than material well-being matter for child development; family and community play an important role. The conclusion is that social and psychological variables are an important component of child welfare. Can such a conclusion be extended to developing countries? It might be thought not, since the dictates of a focus on absolute poverty imply concern with fundamentals such as malnutrition, illiteracy and premature death and the things which cause these outcomes. But such a view is short-sighted. Child development concerns are at least as important in developing countries as developed ones (if less well understood). Hence approaches to child welfare in developing countries (both measurement and policy) should also adopt a broad-based approach which embraces diverse aspects of the quality of a child’s life, including child rights.

Suggested Citation

  • Howard White & Andrew Masters & Jennifer Leavy, 2005. "Comparative Perspectives on Child poverty: a review of poverty measures," Development and Comp Systems 0504017, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0504017
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 36
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    Cited by:

    1. Adel Daoud & Björn Halleröd & Debarati Guha-Sapir, 2016. "What Is the Association between Absolute Child Poverty, Poor Governance, and Natural Disasters? A Global Comparison of Some of the Realities of Climate Change," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(4), pages 1-20, April.
    2. Mario Biggeri & Jean-Francois Trani & Vincenzo Mauro, 2011. "Child Poverty Measurement: the Case of Afghanistan," Working Papers - Economics wp2011_18.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    3. Gross-Manos, Daphna, 2017. "Material well-being and social exclusion association with children's subjective Well-being: Cross-national analysis of 14 countries," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 116-128.
    4. Paola Ballón & John Cockburn & Sylvain Dessy & Setou Diarra, 2018. "Child Monetary Poverty and Multidimensional Deprivations: Why They Differ," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 27(4), pages 483-512.
    5. Gina Crivello & Laura Camfield & Martin Woodhead, 2009. "How Can Children Tell Us About Their Wellbeing? Exploring the Potential of Participatory Research Approaches within Young Lives," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 90(1), pages 51-72, January.
    6. Shamrova, Daria & Lampe, Joana, 2020. "Understanding patterns of child material deprivation in five regions of the world: A children’s rights perspective," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).
    7. Maryam Abdu & Enrique Delamonica, 2018. "Multidimensional Child Poverty: From Complex Weighting to Simple Representation," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 136(3), pages 881-905, April.
    8. Marlous de Milliano & Sudhanshu Handa, 2014. "Pauvreté et privation des enfants au Mali : les premières estimations nationales," Papers inwopa768, Innocenti Working Papers.
    9. Main, Gill, 2019. "Child poverty and subjective well-being: The impact of children's perceptions of fairness and involvement in intra-household sharing," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 49-58.
    10. Jean-Francois Trani & Mario Biggeri & Vincenzo Mauro, 2013. "The Multidimensionality of Child Poverty: Evidence from Afghanistan," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 112(2), pages 391-416, June.
    11. Keetie Roelen & Franziska Gassmann & Chris Neubourg, 2010. "Child Poverty in Vietnam: Providing Insights Using a Country-Specific and Multidimensional Model," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 98(1), pages 129-145, August.
    12. Marlous de Milliano & Sudhanshu Handa, 2014. "Child Poverty and Deprivation in Mali: The first national estimates," Papers inwopa765, Innocenti Working Papers.
    13. Gassmann F. & Siegel M. & Vanore M. & Waidler J., 2013. "The impact of migration on children left behind in Moldova," MERIT Working Papers 2013-043, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    14. Lucia Ferrone & Marlous de Milliano, 2018. "Multidimensional Child Poverty in three Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 11(3), pages 755-781, June.
    15. Yekaterina Chzhen & Chris Neubourg & Ilze Plavgo & Marlous Milliano, 2016. "Child Poverty in the European Union: the Multiple Overlapping Deprivation Analysis Approach (EU-MODA)," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 9(2), pages 335-356, June.
    16. Roelen, Keetie & Gassmann, Franziska, 2008. "Measuring Child Poverty and Well-Being: a literature review," MPRA Paper 8981, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Laura Valadez Martinez, 2014. "Bridging the Gap: Conceptual and Empirical Dimensions of Child Wellbeing in Rural Mexico," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 567-591, April.
    18. Franziska Gassmann & Melissa Siegel & Michaella Vanore & Jennifer Waidler, 2018. "Unpacking the Relationship between Parental Migration and Child well-Being: Evidence from Moldova and Georgia," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 11(2), pages 423-440, April.
    19. Geranda Notten & Keetie Roelen, 2010. "Cross-national comparison of monetary and multidimensional child poverty in the European Union: puzzling with the few pieces that the EUSILC provides," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 13510, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    20. Chris De Neubourg & Yekaterina Chzhen & Gill Main & Bruno Martorano & Leonardo Menchini & Jonathan Bradshaw, 2012. "Child Deprivation, Multidimensional Poverty and Monetary Poverty in Europe," Papers inwopa657, Innocenti Working Papers, revised 2012.
    21. Yekaterina Chzhen & Lucia Ferrone, 2017. "Multidimensional Child Deprivation and Poverty Measurement: Case Study of Bosnia and Herzegovina," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 999-1014, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Children; poverty measurement; child poverty;

    JEL classification:

    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • P - Economic Systems

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