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Agglomeration with the pros and cons of labor heterogeneity

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  • Ryusuke Ihara

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Abstract

Using a simple two-region model with the positive and negative effects of labor heterogeneity, we investigate the agglomeration pattern of entrepreneurs and the commuting pattern of heterogeneous workers. Labor heterogeneity is a source of productivity for e.g. high-tech industries as well as is an obstacle to e.g. mass production. As a result, we show that entrepreneurs tend to concentrate to a region hence regional labor markets are united with interregional commuting when (i) the commuting cost or (ii) the adjustment cost of labor heterogeneity is low, and when (iii) the input of heterogeneous labor is large. These results explain: the progress of urbanization with the decrease in commuting costs; the difference in the agglomeration tendency of industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Ryusuke Ihara, 2011. "Agglomeration with the pros and cons of labor heterogeneity," ERSA conference papers ersa11p528, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa11p528
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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa11/e110830aFinal00528.pdf
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    6. BEHRENS, Kristian & SATO, Yasuhiro, 2006. "Labor market integration and migration: impacts on skill formation and the wage structure," CORE Discussion Papers 2006001, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    7. Chad Sparber, 2009. "Racial Diversity and Aggregate Productivity in U.S. Industries: 1980–2000," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 829-856, January.
    8. Sparber, Chad, 2008. "A theory of racial diversity, segregation, and productivity," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 210-226, October.
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