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Models of BRICs' Economic Development and Challenges for EU Competitiveness

Author

Listed:
  • Jayati Ghosh
  • Peter Havlik

    () (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw)

  • Marcos Poplawski-Ribeiro
  • Waltraut Urban

Abstract

The term BRICs puts under a common label the four largest fast growing emerging countries Brazil, Russia, India and China. The BRICs show many common features, such as big land size, large population, fast economic growth etc., but important differences as well, due to their different models of economic development and resources endowments. In this report, we discuss the different models of economic development of the individual BRIC countries, with a special focus on their external relations (trade, FDI) and on likely future developments. Brazil is a domestically oriented service economy; Russia's economic development is heavily dependent on energy and raw material resources; the Indian economy is essentially service-led, supported by exports; and China's economic development is driven by manufacturing exports and investment. Finally, we explore the resulting future challenges and opportunities for EU competitiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayati Ghosh & Peter Havlik & Marcos Poplawski-Ribeiro & Waltraut Urban, 2009. "Models of BRICs' Economic Development and Challenges for EU Competitiveness," wiiw Research Reports 359, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  • Handle: RePEc:wii:rpaper:rr:359
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    File URL: https://wiiw.ac.at/models-of-brics-economic-development-and-challenges-for-eu-competitiveness-dlp-1969.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Tausch, Arno, 2013. "The hallmarks of crisis. A new center-periphery perspective on long cycles," MPRA Paper 48356, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Syriopoulos, Theodore & Makram, Beljid & Boubaker, Adel, 2015. "Stock market volatility spillovers and portfolio hedging: BRICS and the financial crisis," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 7-18.
    3. Ion Rosu-Hamzescu & Niculina Rosu-Hamzescu, 2011. "The Part Of Brics Countries In International Trade Exchanges," Annals of University of Craiova - Economic Sciences Series, University of Craiova, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, vol. 1(39), pages 124-131.
    4. Mihai Dragu, 2011. "Is It Possible For Europe To Get Help From Brics Countries?," Annals of University of Craiova - Economic Sciences Series, University of Craiova, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, vol. 1(39), pages 206-210.
    5. Altin Tanku, 2012. "The impact of China and Russia on catching up in South-Eastern Europe," Chapters,in: European Integration in a Global Economy, chapter 15, pages 157-176 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic development; Brazil; Russia; India; China; the European Union; competitiveness;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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