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The SADC's infrastructure : a regional perspective

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  • Ranganathan, Rupa
  • Foster, Vivien

Abstract

Infrastructure improvements boosted growth in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) by 1.2 percentage points per capita per year during 1995-2005, mainly from access to mobile telephony. Road network improvements made small growth contributions, while power sector inadequacy had a negative impact. Infrastructure improvements that matched those of Mauritius, the regional leader, could boost regional growth performance by 3 percentage points. SADC's 15 member countries include small, isolated economies with island states, a mix of low- and middle-income countries, and larger countries with potentially large economies. The economic geography reinforces the importance of regional infrastructure development to create a larger market and greater economic opportunities. The region's infrastructure indicators are high for Africa. The regional road network is well-developed, and surface transport is comparatively cheap, but subject to delays and long-haul fees. An extensive railway system competes directly with road transport. With integration and improvements, SADC's ports could form an effective transshipment network. Air transport, dominated by South Africa, is the best in Africa. Electricity in southern Africa is well developed; the region leads Africa in generation capacity and low rates, but access is limited. ICT services are the most accessible among the regions, though expensive. Landlocked countries still need to be connected, and greater competition is needed to reduce costs. Completing and maintaining SADC's infrastructure will require $2.1 billion annually for a decade. For small countries, and large countries with small revenues, the burden may be insurmountable without external assistance.

Suggested Citation

  • Ranganathan, Rupa & Foster, Vivien, 2011. "The SADC's infrastructure : a regional perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5898, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5898
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Foster, Vivien & Steinbuks, Jevgenijs, 2009. "Paying the price for unreliable power supplies : in-house generation of electricity by firms in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4913, The World Bank.
    2. International Finance Corporation & World Bank, 2008. "Doing Business 2009 : Comparing Regulation in 181 Economies," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6313.
    3. Jean-François Arvis & Gaël Raballand & Jean-François Marteau, 2010. "The Cost of Being Landlocked : Logistics Costs and Supply Chain Reliability," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2489.
    4. Yepes, Tito & Pierce, Justin & Foster, Vivien, 2009. "Making sense of Africa's infrastructure endowment : a benchmarking approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4912, The World Bank.
    5. Supee Teravaninthorn & Gaël Raballand, 2009. "Transport Prices and Costs in Africa : A Review of the International Corridors," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6610.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Draper & Andreas Freytag & Sören Scholvin & Luong Thanh Tran, 2016. "Is a ‘Factory Southern Africa’ Feasible?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23788, The World Bank.
    2. Peter Draper & Andreas Freytag & Sören Scholvin & Luong Thanh Tran, 2016. "Is a 'Factory Southern Africa' Feasible? Harnessing Flying Geese to the South African Gateway," CESifo Working Paper Series 5867, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport Economics Policy&Planning; Airports and Air Services; Infrastructure Economics; Transport and Trade Logistics; Roads&Highways;

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