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Poverty, social divisions, and conflict in Nepal

Author

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  • Do, Quy-Toan
  • Iyer, Lakshmi

Abstract

The authors conduct an econometric analysis of the economic and social factors which contributed to the spread of violent conflict in Nepal. They find that conflict intensity is significantly higher in places with greater poverty and lower levels of economic development. Violence is higher in locations that favor insurgents, such as mountains and forests. The authors find weaker evidence that caste divisions in society are correlated with the intensity of civil conflict, while linguistic diversity has little impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Do, Quy-Toan & Iyer, Lakshmi, 2007. "Poverty, social divisions, and conflict in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4228, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4228
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Blattman & Edward Miguel, 2009. "Civil War: A Review of Fifty Years of Research," Working Papers id:2231, eSocialSciences.
    2. Dominic Rohner, 2010. "From rags to rifles: deprivation, conflict and the welfare state," IEW - Working Papers 463, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    3. Juan F. Vargas, 2012. "The persistent Colombian conflict: subnational analysis of the duration of violence," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(2), pages 203-223, April.
    4. Olsson, Ola & Siba, Eyerusalem, 2013. "Ethnic cleansing or resource struggle in Darfur? An empirical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 299-312.
    5. Oeindrila Dube & Juan Fernando Vargas, 2006. "Resource curse in reverse: The coffee crisis and armed conflict in Colombia," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 003460, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    6. John Ishiyama & Marijke Breuning, 2012. "Educational Access and Peace Duration in Post-Conflict Countries," International Interactions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 58-78, January.
    7. Patricia Justino & Ivan Cardona & Rebecca Mitchell & Catherine Müller, 2012. "Quantifying the Impact of Women’s Participation in Post-Conflict Economic Recovery," HiCN Working Papers 131, Households in Conflict Network.
    8. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:6:p:2055-:d:152987 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ola Olsson, 0. "After Janjaweed? Socioeconomic Impacts of the Conflict in Darfur," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(3), pages 386-411.
    10. Christopher Blattman & Edward Miguel, 2010. "Civil War," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(1), pages 3-57, March.
    11. Andrew L. Dabalen & Ephraim Kebede & Saumik Paul, 2012. "Causes of Civil War: Micro Level Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," HiCN Working Papers 118, Households in Conflict Network.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Population Policies; Social Conflict and Violence; Services&Transfers to Poor; Post Conflict Reintegration; Peace&Peacekeeping;

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