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Supply-side school improvement and the learning achievement of the poorest children in indigenous and rural schools - the case of PARE

Author

Listed:
  • Paqueo, Vicente
  • Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys

Abstract

In the past, research findings indicated that most of the differences in student learning were due to socioeconomic factors, and that, therefore, the effect of direct educational interventions to reduce learning inequality was very limited. However, the authors show that learning achievement could increase through appropriately designed, and reasonably well-implemented interventions. An examination of Mexico's PARE program reveals that an increase in learning achievement could be possible for rural, and indigenous schools. The authors'overall conclusion is that supply-side interventions can have substantial effects on the learning achievement of children in indigenous, and rural schools in poor areas. But greater attention needs to be paid to the poorest of the disadvantaged children. This positive conclusion, however, should be tempered by results of the urban sample, confirming earlier findings of the negative relationship between PARE, and student learning growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Paqueo, Vicente & Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys, 2003. "Supply-side school improvement and the learning achievement of the poorest children in indigenous and rural schools - the case of PARE," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3172, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3172
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. World Bank, 2008. "Colombia - The Quality of Education in Colombia : An Analysis and Options for a Policy Agenda," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7875, The World Bank.
    2. David K. Evans & Anna Popova, 2016. "What Really Works to Improve Learning in Developing Countries? An Analysis of Divergent Findings in Systematic Reviews," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 31(2), pages 242-270.
    3. Shapiro, Joseph & Trevino, Jorge Moreno, 2004. "Compensatory education for disadvantaged Mexican students : an impact evaluation using propensity score matching," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3334, The World Bank.
    4. World Bank, 2005. "Mexico : Determinants of Learning Policy Note," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8284, The World Bank.
    5. Rodríguez, Catherine & Sánchez, Fabio & Armenta, Armando, 2010. "Do Interventions at School Level Improve Educational Outcomes? Evidence from a Rural Program in Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 415-428, March.
    6. Gertler, Paul J. & Patrinos, Harry Anthony & Rubio-Codina, Marta, 2012. "Empowering parents to improve education: Evidence from rural Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 68-79.
    7. Masino, Serena & Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel, 2016. "What works to improve the quality of student learning in developing countries?," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 53-65.
    8. Santibañez, Lucrecia, 2016. "The indigenous achievement gap in Mexico: The role of teacher policy under intercultural bilingual education," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 63-75.

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