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Costs of infrastructure deficiencies in manufacturing in Indonesia, Nigeria, and Thailand

Author

Listed:
  • Kyu Sik Lee
  • Anas, Alex
  • Gi-Taik Oh

Abstract

Using fresh results from a sample survey of manufacturing establishments in Indonesia and Thailand, the authors contrast and compare with data from an earlier study on Nigeria. They compare especially: the extent and incidence of public infrastructure deficiencies; the extent of manufacturers'private provision of infrastructure in response to such deficiencies; the capital shares of various private infrastructure investments, including electric power, water, telecommunications, transport, and waste disposal; and the firms'costs for producing their own electricity and water. The extent of public infrastructure deficiencies and private provision of infrastructure services varies across countries and by firm size. The total share of capital investment in private infrastructure was similar among Nigerian and Indonesian firms (14 - 16 percent) which is twice that in Thai firms. The private costs of infrastructure deficiencies are substantial and the burdens are much greater on small firms than on large firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Kyu Sik Lee & Anas, Alex & Gi-Taik Oh, 1996. "Costs of infrastructure deficiencies in manufacturing in Indonesia, Nigeria, and Thailand," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1604, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:1604
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tidiane Kinda & Patrick Plane & Marie‐Ange Véganzonès‐Varoudakis, 2011. "Firm Productivity And Investment Climate In Developing Countries: How Does Middle East And North Africa Manufacturing Perform?," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 49(4), pages 429-462, December.
    2. Straub, Stephane, 2008. "Infrastructure and growth in developing countries : recent advances and research challenges," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4460, The World Bank.
    3. Nausheen H. Anwar, 1999. "Inefficiencies in Public Electricity Provision and Impacts on Firms in Karachi’s Manufacturing Sector," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 167-185.
    4. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Moreno-Dodson, Blanca, 2006. "Public infrastructure and growth : new channels and policy implications," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4064, The World Bank.
    5. Gulyani, Sumila, 1999. "Innovating with Infrastructure: How India's Largest Carmaker Copes with Poor Electricity Supply," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(10), pages 1749-1768, October.
    6. repec:idb:idbbks:358 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Mila Freire & Mario Polèse & Pamela Echeverria, 2003. "Connecting Cities with Macroeconomic Concerns : The Missing Link," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15058, April.
    8. Alby, Philippe & Dethier, Jean-Jacques & Straub, Stephane, 2010. "Firms operating under infrastructure and credit constraints in developing countries : the case of power generators," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5497, The World Bank.
    9. Vivien Foster & José Luis Guasch & Luis Andrés & Thomas Haven, 2008. "The Impact of Private Sector Participation in Infrastructure: Lights, Shadows, and the Road Ahead," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 59818, February.
    10. Luis A. Andrés & J. Luis Guasch & Thomas Haven & Vivien Foster, 2008. "The Impact of Private Sector Participation in Infrastructure : Lights, Shadows, and the Road Ahead," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6545, April.

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