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Comportements de collaboration homme-femme et visibilité scientifique en économie et en gestion

Author

Listed:
  • Abdelghani Maddi

    (Centre d'Economie de l'Université de Paris Nord (CEPN))

  • Vincent Larivière

    (EBSI, Université de Montréal)

  • Yves Gingras

    (CIRST, Université du Québec à Montréal)

Abstract

La question de la place des femmes en science est aujourd’hui amplement discutée dans toutes les disciplines. Le domaine des sciences économiques et de la gestion ne fait pas exception et requiert lui aussi une analyse réflexive sur ses pratiques. Cette étude contribue à une meilleure compréhension de la place des femmes dans ces disciplines en caractérisant le comportement de collaboration scientifique entre les hommes et les femmes en économie et en gestion, mesuré par les publications conjointes. Les résultats montrent pour la première fois de manière empirique que les pratiques de collaboration entre deux sexes sont différentes dans les sciences de la gestion par rapport aux sciences économiques.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdelghani Maddi & Vincent Larivière & Yves Gingras, 2018. "Comportements de collaboration homme-femme et visibilité scientifique en économie et en gestion," CEPN Working Papers 2018-06, Centre d'Economie de l'Université de Paris Nord.
  • Handle: RePEc:upn:wpaper:2018-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Beaudry, Catherine & Larivière, Vincent, 2016. "Which gender gap? Factors affecting researchers’ scientific impact in science and medicine," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(9), pages 1790-1817.
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    4. Vincent Larivière & Yves Gingras, 2010. "The impact factor's Matthew Effect: A natural experiment in bibliometrics," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 61(2), pages 424-427, February.
    5. Vincent Larivière & Etienne Vignola-Gagné & Christian Villeneuve & Pascal Gélinas & Yves Gingras, 2011. "Sex differences in research funding, productivity and impact: an analysis of Québec university professors," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 87(3), pages 483-498, June.
    6. Mingers, John & Xu, Fang, 2010. "The drivers of citations in management science journals," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 205(2), pages 422-430, September.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Genre; publications scientifiques; impact académique; bibliométrie; économie; gestion;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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