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Explaining Public Attitudes on State Legislative Professionalism



Scholars have long argued that state legislative professionalism, or the provision of staff, legislator salary, and session length, has behavioral incentives for legislators and implications for legislative capacity. Scant attention, however, has been devoted to public attitudes on the provision of these legislative resources. Using survey data on preferences for features associated with a citizen legislature versus a professional legislature, we examine the contours of public attitudes on professionalism and test models on the factors associated with these attitudes. Results suggest partisanship, trust, and approval of the local delegation matter, but the factors differ by the legislative professionalism of the respondents state and for low versus high knowledge citizens.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey Milyo & David M. Konisky & Lilliard E. Richardson, Jr., 2008. "Explaining Public Attitudes on State Legislative Professionalism," Working Papers 0812, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  • Handle: RePEc:umc:wpaper:0812

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Legislative Professionalism; Public Opinion; Political Economy;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H79 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Other
    • H83 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Public Administration

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