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Height and well-being amongst older Europeans

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  • Kevin Denny

    (School of Economics, University College Dublin)

Abstract

This paper uses a cross-country representative sample of Europeans over the age of 50 to analyse whether individuals’ height is associated with higher or lower levels of well-being. Two outcomes are used: a measure of depression symptoms reported by individuals and a categorical measure of life satisfaction. It is shown that there is a concave relationship between height and symptoms of depression. These results are sensitive to the inclusion of several sets of controls reflecting demographics, human capital and health status. While parsimonious models suggest that height is protective against depression, the addition of controls, particularly related to health, suggests the reverse effect: tall people are predicted to have slightly more symptoms of depression. Height has no significant association with life satisfaction in models with controls for health and human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Denny, 2010. "Height and well-being amongst older Europeans," Working Papers 201048, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucd:wpaper:201048
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    File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/geary/static/publications/workingpapers/gearywp201048.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The negative effect of height on well-being: a tall story?
      by Kevin Denny in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-10-22 08:03:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Alan Fernihough & Mark E. McGovern, 2013. "A Tall Story: Characteristics, Causes, and Consequences of Stature Loss," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp429, IIIS.
    2. Carrieri, Vincenzo & De Paola, Maria, 2012. "Height and subjective well-being in Italy," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 289-298.
    3. Vincenzo Carrieri & Maria De Paola, 2011. "The Effects Of Peoples’ Height And Relative Height On Well-Being," Working Papers 201110, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    height; depression; well-being; life satisfaction; health;

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