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Foreign Banks in Eastern Europe: Mode of Entry and Effects on Bank Interest Rates

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  • Claeys, Sophie
  • Hainz, Christa

Abstract

Credit markets in many Eastern European countries are now dominated by foreign-owned banks. We analyze the development for foreign ownership and its impact on lending rate in ten Eastern European countries between 1995 and 2003. Currently, the majority of loans from foreign banks is granted by acquired banks. The presence of foreign acquired banks as measured by their relative number among the banks in our dataset increased somewhat slower than that of foreign de novo banks. However, since market entry through acquisition allows acquiring a credit portfolio and a customer base, acquired banks were able to expand their market share much faster than the foreign de novo banks. Our results also show that the interest rate decreased after foreign bank entry. Moreover, while the reduction in interest rates of domestic banks is more pronounced in the case of foreign entry through a de novo investment, foreign de novo banks charge higher interest rates than foreign acquired banks.

Suggested Citation

  • Claeys, Sophie & Hainz, Christa, 2006. "Foreign Banks in Eastern Europe: Mode of Entry and Effects on Bank Interest Rates," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 95, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:trf:wpaper:95
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Demirguc, Asli & Huizinga, Harry, 1999. "Determinants of Commercial Bank Interest Margins and Profitability: Some International Evidence," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 379-408, May.
    2. Giannetti, Mariassunta & Ongena, Steven, 2005. "Financial Integration and Entrepreneurial Activity: Evidence from Foreign Bank Entry in Emerging Markets," CEPR Discussion Papers 5151, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Maria Soledad Martinez Peria & Ashoka Mody, 2004. "How foreign participation and market concentration impact bank spreads: evidence from Latin America," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 511-542.
    4. Majnoni, Giovanni & Shankar, Rashmi & Varhegyi, Eva, 2003. "The dynamics of foreign bank ownership - evidence from Hungary," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3114, The World Bank.
    5. Claessens, Stijn & Demirguc-Kunt, Asl[iota] & Huizinga, Harry, 2001. "How does foreign entry affect domestic banking markets?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 891-911, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeon, Bang Nam & Olivero, María Pía & Wu, Ji, 2013. "Multinational banking and the international transmission of financial shocks: Evidence from foreign bank subsidiaries," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 952-972.
    2. Christophe J. Godlewski & Ydriss Ziane, 2008. "How many banks does it take to lend? Empirical evidence from Europe," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2008-11, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.
    3. Haselmann, Rainer, 2006. "Strategies of foreign banks in transition economies," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 283-299, December.
    4. Bang Nam Jeon & Maria Pia Olivero & Ji Wu, 2013. "Multinational Banking and Financial Contagion: Evidence from Foreign Bank Subsidiaries," Working Papers 052013, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    5. Daniel Badulescu & Nicolae Petria, 2010. "Have The Recent Crisis Affected Foreign Banks’ Positions In Central And Eastern Europe? (I – General Overview)," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 406-411, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    SME; Banking; Foreign Entry; Mode of Entry; Interest Rate;

    JEL classification:

    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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