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Football to Improve Math and Reading Performance


  • Van Klaveren, C.
  • De Witte, K.


Schools frequently increase instructional time to improve students' numeric and reading performance, but there is little evidence on the effectiveness of such an increase. This study evaluates 'Playing for Success', an extended day program for underachieving pupils that uses the football environment as a motivating force. Primary school pupils with low motivation and self-esteem are offered practical and sports related teaching content for 30 additional hours. The program is evaluated using a randomized controlled field experiment. The results indicate that Playing for Success does not signicantly improve math and reading performance of primary school students.

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  • Van Klaveren, C. & De Witte, K., 2012. "Football to Improve Math and Reading Performance," Working Papers 43, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tir:wpaper:43

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marcotte, Dave E., 2007. "Schooling and test scores: A mother-natural experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 629-640, October.
    2. Engberg, John & Gill, Brian & Zamarro, Gema & Zimmer, Ron, 2012. "Closing schools in a shrinking district: Do student outcomes depend on which schools are closed?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 189-203.
    3. de Haan, Monique & Leuven, Edwin & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 2011. "Scale Economies Can Offset the Benefits of Competition: Evidence from a School Consolidation Reform in a Universal Voucher System," IZA Discussion Papers 5528, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Dave E. Marcotte & Steven W. Hemelt, 2008. "Unscheduled School Closings and Student Performance," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 3(3), pages 316-338, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Almeida,Rita Kullberg & Bresolin,Antonio & Pugialli Da Silva Borges,Bruna & Mendes,Karen & Menezes Filho,Naercio, 2016. "Assessing the impacts of Mais Educacao on educational outcomes : evidence between 2007 and 2011," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7644, The World Bank.
    2. Van Klaveren, C. & De Wolf, I., 2013. "Systematic Reviews In Education Research: When Do Effect Studies Provide Evidence?," Working Papers 46, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.

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    Achievement; Child Development; Evaluation; Motivation; Extended School Day.;

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