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Access to College and University: Does Distance Matter?

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  • Frenette, Marc

Abstract

Previous research suggests that high-school students living beyond commuting distance from a university are far less likely to attend, especially if they are from a lower-income family. This study asks three follow-up questions. First, do students who live too far to attend university 'make-up' for this disadvantage by attending college (if one is nearby)? Second, how does this uptake in college participation differ by class of income? And finally, does distance to school deter students from attending college? After controlling for various factors associated with postsecondary participation, including sex, province, family income, and parental education, students living near a college are more likely to attend college than those students living near both a university and a college. The magnitude of this uptake in college participation almost completely counterbalances the difference in university participation, yielding similar postsecondary participation rates between the two groups. It was found that the uptake in college participation in outlying areas mainly occurs within groups of students who are from lower- and middle-income families, and who live far away from universities. Although there are very few students living beyond commuting distance from a college, research has shown that these students are far less likely to attend college, especially if they are from a lower-income family.

Suggested Citation

  • Frenette, Marc, 2003. "Access to College and University: Does Distance Matter?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003201e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2003201e
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    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2003201&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sen, Anindya & Clemente, Anthony, 2010. "Intergenerational correlations in educational attainment: Birth order and family size effects using Canadian data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 147-155, February.
    2. Michal Franta & Martin Guzi, 2008. "Unequal Access to Higher Education in the Czech Republic: The Role of Spatial Distribution of Universities," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp350, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    3. Beckstead, Desmond & Brown, W. Mark & Newbold, Bruce, 2008. "Cities and Growth: In Situ Versus Migratory Human Capital Growth," The Canadian Economy in Transition 2008019e, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division.
    4. Philippe Belley & Marc Frenette & Lance Lochner, 2011. "Post-Secondary Attendance by Parental Income in the U.S. and Canada: What Role for Financial Aid Policy?," University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute Working Papers 20113, University of Western Ontario, Economic Policy Research Institute.
    5. Frenette, Marc, 2005. "Is Post-secondary Access More Equitable in Canada or the United States?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005244e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    6. Kapsalis, Constantine, 2006. "Who Gets Student Loans?," MPRA Paper 25698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Philippe Belley & Marc Frenette & Lance Lochner, 2010. "Post-Secondary Attendance by Parental Income: Comparing the U.S. and Canada," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 20103, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
    8. Stijn Kelchtermans & Frank Verboven, 2010. "Participation and study decisions in a public system of higher education," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 355-391.
    9. Steve Gibbons & Anna Vignoles, 2009. "Access, Choice and Participation in Higher Education," CEE Discussion Papers 0101, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    10. Michael B Coelli, 2009. "Parental Job Loss, Income Shocks and the Education Enrolment of Youth," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1060, The University of Melbourne.
    11. Frenette, Marc, 2007. "Do Universities Benefit Local Youth? Evidence from University and College Participation, and Graduate Earnings Following the Creation of a New University," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2006283e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    12. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan, 2008. "Family Background, Family Income, Cognitive Tests Scores, Behavioural Scales and their Relationship with Post-secondary Education Participation: Evidence from the NLSCY," Cahiers de recherche 0830, CIRPEE.
    13. Drolet, Marie, 2005. "Participation in Post-secondary Education in Canada: Has the Role of Parental Income and Education Changed over the 1990s?," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005243e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    14. Frenette, Marc, 2007. "Pourquoi les jeunes provenant de familles a plus faible revenu sont-ils moins susceptibles de frequenter l'universite? Analyse fondee sur les aptitudes aux etudes, l'influence des parents et les contr," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2007295f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    15. Lavallée, Laval & Kapsalis, Constantine & Usher, Alexander, 2005. "Rural Versus Urban Students – Differences in Accessing and Financing PSE, Their PSE Outcomes and Their Use of Distance Education Research Projects," MPRA Paper 25768, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Frenette, Marc, 2007. "Est-ce que les universites profitent a la population locale de jeunes? Resultats provenant de la frequentation des universites et des colleges, et des gains des diplomes suivant la creation d'une nouv," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2006283f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.

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    Keywords

    Children and youth; Education; Education; training and learning; Educational attainment; Students;

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