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Understanding the Innovation Process: Innovation in Dynamic Service Industries

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  • Gellatly, Guy
  • Peters, Valerie

Abstract

In studies of business innovation, the term innovation process is used to describe (i) the array of sources and objectives that culminate in the act of innovation, (ii) the set of market effects that result from innovation, and (iii) the obstacles that firms encounter when pursuing innovation strategies. An examination of the innovation process is thus designed to bring about a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics that innovative firms share, as well as of those characteristics that set innovators apart from other businesses. The Survey of Innovation, 1996 examined innovation in three dynamic service industries: communications, financial services, and technical business services. This paper explores the principal findings to emerge from the Survey of Innovation, 1996. Two themes are apparent. In the first instance, many elements of the innovation process are common to all the service industries studied, such as an emphasis on product innovation, a strong customer orientation, and a commitment to service quality. Beyond these common elements, however, differences in competitive pressures across these industries serve to engender important differences in innovation strategies. Accordingly, much of what we can ultimately learn about the innovation process occurs at the industry level.

Suggested Citation

  • Gellatly, Guy & Peters, Valerie, 2000. "Understanding the Innovation Process: Innovation in Dynamic Service Industries," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2000127e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  • Handle: RePEc:stc:stcp3e:2000127e
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    File URL: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/olc-cel/olc.action?ObjId=11F0019M2000127&ObjType=46&lang=en&limit=0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baldwin, John R. & Hanel, Peter & Sabourin, David, 2000. "Determinants of Innovative Activity in Canadian Manufacturing Firms: The Role of Intellectual Property Rights," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2000122e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Baldwin, John R. & Gellatly, Guy, 1998. "Are There High-tech Industries or Only High-tech Firms? Evidence from New Technology-based Firms," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1998120e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    3. Bronwyn H. Hall, 1992. "Investment and Research and Development at the Firm Level: Does the Source of Financing Matter?," NBER Working Papers 4096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Mozes, D. & Sciadas, G, 1995. "The Demand for Telecommunication Services," Papers 5, Statistique Canada, Sciences et technologie-.
    5. Baldwin, John R., 1997. "The Importance of Research and Development for Innovation in Small and Large Canadian Manufacturing Firms," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 1997107e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Danny García, 2007. "Innovation and Growth: A Survey of the Literature and a Case Study for Latin America," REVISTA ECOS DE ECONOMÍA, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT, October.
    2. Beckstead, Desmond & Gellatly, Guy, 2004. "Are Knowledge Workers Found Only in High-technology Industries?," The Canadian Economy in Transition 2004005e, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division.
    3. Spyros Arvanitis & Juliette von Arx, 2004. "Bestimmungsfaktoren der Innovationstätigkeit und deren Einfluss auf Arbeitsproduktivität, Beschäftigung und Qualifikationsstruktur," KOF Working papers 04-91, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    4. Baldwin, John R. & Gellatly, Guy, 2006. "Innovation Capabilities: The Knowledge Capital Behind the Survival and Growth of Firms," The Canadian Economy in Transition 2006013e, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis Division.

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