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The Development of Support for Motherhood and Childhood in Russia
[Развитие Поддержки Материнства И Детства В России]

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  • Makarentseva, Alla (Макаренцева, Алла)

    (Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA))

  • Tretyakova, Ekaterina (Третьякова, Екатерина)

    (Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA))

  • Khasanova, Ramilya (Хасанова, Рамиля)

    (Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA))

Abstract

Supporting families with children is a system of actions (provision of services, economic support and development of institutions) aimed at improving the family's fulfillment of their functions, in particular, the birth and upbringing of children. Increasing the effectiveness of support is expressed by the fact that in more families there are conditions for the birth of the desired number of children at the desired time, and the environment for their upbringing improves. The latter implies that, in the maximum possible number of families, children will have access to medicine, high-quality nutrition, comfortable housing, education; That the maximum possible number of children will be brought up in a family environment, in comfortable psychological conditions, without being exposed to the risks of violence. In this review work, the development of economic and service support for the family, motherhood and childhood in Russia is considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Makarentseva, Alla (Макаренцева, Алла) & Tretyakova, Ekaterina (Третьякова, Екатерина) & Khasanova, Ramilya (Хасанова, Рамиля), 2017. "The Development of Support for Motherhood and Childhood in Russia [Развитие Поддержки Материнства И Детства В России]," Working Papers 031701, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rnp:wpaper:031701
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